A Māori artist has shared a heartwarming tribute towards the Muslim community following the Christchurch mosque attacks.

Akoni Pakinga, who lives in Rotorua, posted a painting of Māori gathered around a Muslim man standing underneath a waharoa.

Their hands are placed on his shoulders, mourning and expressing great sadness and grief for the Muslim man.

The artist revealed the painting represents culture, religion, sadness and unity. Photo / Akoni Pakinga
The artist revealed the painting represents culture, religion, sadness and unity. Photo / Akoni Pakinga

With the help of his friend Lee Tawhai who coloured most of the artwork, Pakinga was able to share how he felt about the situation with New Zealand.

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"Reality hit me pretty hard on Friday, so I painted, as cliche as it is, a picture can speak a thousand words," he posted on Facebook.

"I cannot express how sorry I am, this is your home too, Tautoko."

Pakinga told the Herald he shared the photo as he felt like it was his way of giving after the attacks.

"It was tragic, it was sad to hear that it was happening in our country," he said.

"It wasn't for me, it was selfless, I wasn't after any attention."

The artist revealed the painting represents culture, religion, sadness and unity.

"New Zealand is our country... we've pulled together quite strongly in these last few days," he explained.

"We are doing an awesome job in coming together and unifying."

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Pakinga said his painting has resonated with a lot of people as it has a lot of meaning behind it — many have praised the artwork on Facebook.

"Very poignant and heartfelt Akoni. So much sorrow here in Christchurch, but an absolute tsunami of love, aroha and compassion flooding out of everyone towards our Muslim whanau," one person wrote.

Another wrote: "Pulls on the heartstrings and definitely shows how I feel togetherness is the way forward."

An artist from Auckland, Paul X Walsh, immortalised the hero who tackled the shooter.

Walsh has painted a tribute to Naeem Rashid, one of the 50 victims of the terror attack last Friday.

Rashid and his 21-year-old son were in the Al Noor Mosque. He tried to stop the shooter but was killed trying to save others' lives. His son, Talha Naeem, also died.

The artist posted the artwork on his Facebook page, explaining that the green and black background represents "Pakistan and New Zealand, united in mourning".

"I wish I didn't know who Naeem was. I wish he was back at his job as a teacher today, and I wish I was painting something else," Walsh wrote.

"But some coward changed everything, and I have had to respond in the only way I know how; by honouring the lives of my fellow New Zealanders who didn't make it home on Friday.

"We will not forget you."

The piece is at a parking lot at 1925 Great North Rd, in Avondale, Auckland.