A New Zealand man has pleaded not guilty to the murder of Robert Sabeckis at a beach in South Australia almost 20 years ago.

Robert Sabeckis was shot dead at Maslin Beach, south of Adelaide in January 13, 2000.

In March last year, a 44-year-old was extradited to South Australia after his DNA was allegedly matched to some found at the scene.

The man appeared in Adelaide Magistrates Court this morning and plead not guilty to Sabeckis' murder, ABC News reports.

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The man's arrest followed 18 years without leads despite a number of calls from Australian Police for public assistance.

Robert Sabeckis was murdered in South Australia in 2000. Photo / Supplied
Robert Sabeckis was murdered in South Australia in 2000. Photo / Supplied

Last year, the Herald revealed the man, from Piha in West Auckland, was arrested at 6pm on March 15.

The arrest came after police in South Australia allegedly linked the man by DNA to the killing of Sabeckis.

Sabeckis, 42, was killed at a carpark on Tuit Rd, Maslin Beach, a southern coastal suburb of Adelaide.

He died as a result of multiple gunshot wounds.

Police allege that after the shooting the killer drove off in Sabeckis' vehicle, which was then crashed into bushes and a fence further along Tuit Rd.

Police officer Mike Symonds with the modified shotgun used in the murder of Robert Sabeckis. Photo / Supplied
Police officer Mike Symonds with the modified shotgun used in the murder of Robert Sabeckis. Photo / Supplied

He was then seen running from the vehicle across paddocks.

Police found a sawn-off shotgun and jacket in the area.

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They believe the gun was used to kill Sabeckis and the jacket belonged to the killer.

The shotgun and another firearm, were stolen during a break-in at a house at Aldinga Beach south of Adelaide on New Year's Eve - just days before Sabeckis was murdered.
The house was then burned down, destroying potential forensic evidence.

DNA believed to belong to the killer was taken from several items.

It was never matched to anyone until a change in New Zealand legislation allowed overseas law enforcement agencies to apply for access.