The National Party's internal review into its culture will be completed before the end of the year.

A spokesman for National said any recommendations that come from the review would also be implemented before the New Year.

Last month, National Leader Simon Bridges told media he had ordered an internal review into the party's culture following claims of bullying and intimidation against women by former National MP Jami-Lee Ross.

Bridges wanted to ensure the party had an environment where women felt safe.

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The internal review would make sure woman felt absolutely safe in the workplace and feel they could confidently come forward on all matters, he said.

"We are getting independent advice to make sure we have got the best systems and process so women do feel safe," Bridges said at the time.

In a statement to the Herald, a National spokesman said the party's board had agreed to review its full health and safety policy and to seek advice from an external provider to ensure they remain fit for purpose.

"If there are areas to improve on, and things we can do better, we will make changes.

"It is our plan to have this review done, and any new recommendations implemented, by the end of the year."

Despite ordering the review, the Bridges said he didn't think there was a cultural issue within the party.

Meanwhile, the police said an investigation into claims of electoral fraud by Ross was ongoing.

Ross took his claims against Bridges and National to the police shortly after he made them publicly.

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Bridges was quick to deny the claims, calling them "baseless" and "defamatory".

"The investigation is ongoing and inquiries are continuing. We are not in a position to put a timeframe on the process," a police spokeswoman said today.

Despite being kicked out of the National Party, Ross remains the MP for Botany.

As such, he remains in Parliament as an MP.

But it remains unclear when Ross would return to Parliament.

Asked if Ross had indicated to Speaker Trevor Mallard when he would be returning to Parliament, a spokeswoman said all of the Speaker's communications with members on leave was confidential.