A century and a quarter ago the suffrage movement gave New Zealand women the right to vote, and with it a voice.

Five generations after the battle was won, we captured the lives of New Zealand women over 24 hours in 2018 and asked them whether their voice is heard today.

12am

TANIA IOAPO, 33, AUCKLAND AIRPORT AIRFIELD OPERATIONS TEAM LEADER, AUCKLAND

Auckland Airport airfield operations team leader Tania Ioapo says she fought hard to eventually get the management role. Photo / Supplied
Auckland Airport airfield operations team leader Tania Ioapo says she fought hard to eventually get the management role. Photo / Supplied

My team's primary role is to ensure safe and efficient airfield and aircraft operations from touchdown to take-off.

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It's my first week in the leadership role. It's a significant step up for me as the massive responsibility of managing the overall operation of the airfield, not to mention when things go wrong, lies with me.

I'm from the Cook Islands and for me to come here with English as my second language was a big challenge. I've worked hard and fought my way up to be in a position of respect and responsibility.

I have a voice, and people listen to me, I'm able to accomplish difficult tasks in a high-pressure environment to ensure a good outcome.

1am

JADE SEATOR, 21, POLICE OFFICER, TAURANGA

Tauranga police officer Jade Seator, with Rogue, who is being fostered by a colleague and may eventually be a police dog. Photo / Supplied
Tauranga police officer Jade Seator, with Rogue, who is being fostered by a colleague and may eventually be a police dog. Photo / Supplied

I feel we as a country have come a long way and continue to grow and strengthen women's rights and equality.

For example the New Zealand Police include the core value of "valuing diversity" which I believe includes women in the organisation and upholding this value in our work with the public.

In today's society I do feel my voice is heard.

2am

SARAH MCMINN, 36, ONLINE HEALTH AND WELLNESS BUSINESS OWNER, RANGIORA

Since studying Kate Sheppard in school in 1993, I've always felt empowered as a New Zealand woman, that I have a voice.

On becoming a mum, I left working for a large corporation where roles were equal but the pay wasn't, and started an online business aligned to give everyone a voice.

I work around our daughters' needs and that's the role model I want to be for them.

3am

KAREN OAKLEY, 54, CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, MAKARAU

North Shore Hospital clinical nurse manager Karen Oakley is the only female in her household, so she has learned to make herself heard. Photo / Brett Phibbs
North Shore Hospital clinical nurse manager Karen Oakley is the only female in her household, so she has learned to make herself heard. Photo / Brett Phibbs

Yes, I do ... I am the only female in a house of five males so I've learned how to make myself heard!

At a national level, we [women] have come a long way but we can still go further.

There's still the issue of equal pay. But, the way we're going, I don't think it's going to be an issue for much longer."

4am

REJINA BHATTARAI, 24, BAKER, AUCKLAND

Scratch Bakers' baker Rejina Bhattarai says its not about your gender, but the position you hold, at her work. Photo / Brett Phibbs
Scratch Bakers' baker Rejina Bhattarai says its not about your gender, but the position you hold, at her work. Photo / Brett Phibbs

Yes, it is heard.

In my workplace, it's 50/50. It's not about the gender, it's all about the post you're holding. That's all that matters over here.

5am

NIVA RETIMANU, 50, Newstalk ZB breakfast newsreader, Auckland

Newstalk ZB newsreader Niva Retimanu knows women need to keep pushing the boundaries. Photo / Brett Phibbs
Newstalk ZB newsreader Niva Retimanu knows women need to keep pushing the boundaries. Photo / Brett Phibbs

As a radio newsreader, my voice is heard loud and clear across the airwaves from 5 o'clock every weekday morning.

But as a woman in 2018, is my voice really heard? My workplace encourages me to be the best I can be.

I'm not one to rest on my laurels. I'm aware women need to keep pushing the boundaries.

"The number of ways to live in one lifetime is limitless. So why limit yourself?" - Suzy Kassem.

6am

CARLY PARKER, 27, CARDRONA ALPINE RESORT EVENTS SUPERVISOR, WANAKA

Cardrona Alpine Resort events supervisor Carly Parker says skills she's learned involving tools and machinery have been a huge advantage to her everyday life. Photo / Mark Clinton
Cardrona Alpine Resort events supervisor Carly Parker says skills she's learned involving tools and machinery have been a huge advantage to her everyday life. Photo / Mark Clinton

When I first came into the role in 2013, I was one of the three ladies in a crew of 17. This winter we have nearly 50 per cent of females representing our events team.

The skills I have learned on the job involving tools and machinery has been a huge advantage to my everyday life.

I believe my voice is heard in the way our department has grown over the years into a high-performance delivery events team with a perfect balance of males to females.

7am

KATHY LYNCH, 60, MERCY HOSPICE CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, AUCKLAND

Sister Kathy Lynch, left, clinical nurse specialist at Sisters of Mercy Hospice, shows Merry Toka how to knit. Photo / Brett Phibbs
Sister Kathy Lynch, left, clinical nurse specialist at Sisters of Mercy Hospice, shows Merry Toka how to knit. Photo / Brett Phibbs

Yes I do believe that my voice as a woman is heard today.

As a registered nurse working in palliative care I clearly experience our voices, as women, being heard.

The majority of healthcare providers in palliative care are women. I believe we make a vital contribution to the wellbeing of New Zealand society.

As a Sister of Mercy I recognise that the contribution we are able to make today is in a large part due to the foresight and selfless work of many courageous women of past generations.

8am

SHAUNEY MCINTYRE, 26, DAIRY FARMER, METHVEN

Shauney McIntyre is a dairy farmer at Methven, inland Canterbury. Photo / Robyn Hood
Shauney McIntyre is a dairy farmer at Methven, inland Canterbury. Photo / Robyn Hood

Yes I do ... i work in an industry which has been predominantly and traditionally male-based; however in the past 10 years there has been a huge shift within the dairy sector and we are seeing a lot more women coming through - even in higher managerial roles.

I think women on the whole still find it very hard competing on a physical level with males, so there are still questions around whether or not there is equal opportunity when it comes to securing jobs. However with such a strong women's dairy network in New Zealand now, it is only onwards and up for women in the dairy industry.

9am

ANTONIA MURPHY, 43, ETHICAL BROTHEL OWNER, WHANGAREI

Antonia Murphy runs a brothel in Whangarei. Photo / Michael Cunningham / Northern Advocate
Antonia Murphy runs a brothel in Whangarei. Photo / Michael Cunningham / Northern Advocate

My message is that safe, legal sex work can give women a path to financial freedom.

That's hard for people to hear—it makes them uncomfortable.

10am

FIONA CULLINEY, 32, CROWN PROSECUTOR, AUCKLAND

Crown prosecutor Fiona Culliney still sees sexism and discrimination
Crown prosecutor Fiona Culliney still sees sexism and discrimination "all too frequently" in and out of the courtroom. Photo / Brett Phibbs

I am fortunate enough to work in an organisation which values and supports women. So in that sense, yes, my voice is heard.

However, the situation is slightly different in the courtroom.

The environment is changing and I applaud those who are encouraging and enforcing change, but I still encounter sexism and discrimination all too frequently in and out of the courtroom, both from other practitioners and, on occasion, from the court itself.

11am

LYNDA WHITEHEAD, 69, TRANZACTION NZ CHAIRWOMAN / SIGNWRITER, CHRISTCHURCH

Lynda Whitehead runs her own sign-writing business as well as managing her work as Tranzaction NZ chairwoman. Photo / Martin Hunter
Lynda Whitehead runs her own sign-writing business as well as managing her work as Tranzaction NZ chairwoman. Photo / Martin Hunter

Yes, I have a voice, and as a Trans–woman, it's a loud and proud one.

This year we celebrate 125 years of women's suffrage; brave women fought for recognition and the right to vote, they won.

Today Trans-people fight for the right to be accepted and to live peacefully in a fair and just society.

12pm

GRACE HEMARA-TYLDEN, 18, ST JOSEPH'S MĀORI GIRLS' COLLEGE STUDENT, NAPIER

St Joseph's Maori Girls' School student Grace Hemara-Tylden does not feel the voices of young people are heard. Photo / Warren Buckland / Hawke's Bay Today
St Joseph's Maori Girls' School student Grace Hemara-Tylden does not feel the voices of young people are heard. Photo / Warren Buckland / Hawke's Bay Today

No, as I believe that my concerns as a young Māori woman are not heard, and I can say this is the reality for all young women of my generation of upcoming leaders of Aotearoa.

1pm

PRIMLA KHAR, 50'S , GP/NZ INDIAN CENTRAL ASSOCIATION WOMENS' FORUM CHAIRWOMAN, AUCKLAND

GP Primla Khar's voice is heard, but many others are not. Photo / Doug Sherring
GP Primla Khar's voice is heard, but many others are not. Photo / Doug Sherring

Availing my voting right in all competing decisions makes my voice heard. Sound education and financial independence strengthens my voice.

Despite this I still feel the need to facilitate other women's voices who, due to cultural taboos, have been muted all along.

2pm

BRIDGET CARTER, 36, PREDATOR-FREE RAKIURA PROJECT MANAGER, HALFMOON BAY (STEWART ISLAND)

Predator Free Rakiura worker Bridget Carter takes her daughter, Quinn, to work with her around their Stewart Island home some days. Photo / Supplied
Predator Free Rakiura worker Bridget Carter takes her daughter, Quinn, to work with her around their Stewart Island home some days. Photo / Supplied

Yes, by those who are willing to listen.

The question for us all is how to listen and exercise compassion among the shouts of those with shameless, divisive, self-promoting agendas?

As we celebrate 125 years of women's suffrage in New Zealand, we can respect the hard work and freedom, earned by those who came before, by ensuring equality starts with our own behaviour toward others. Divisions set aside.

3pm

SALEIMA CHARLTON, 80, AUCKLAND

Saleima Charlton, 80, is surrounded by photos of family at her home in Hillsborough, Auckland. Photo / Fiona Goodall / Getty Images
Saleima Charlton, 80, is surrounded by photos of family at her home in Hillsborough, Auckland. Photo / Fiona Goodall / Getty Images

I know my voice is heard and valued because I am the mother and matriarch of our family.

But I also know it's time to listen to my children about what they want for me and for our family.

I know one day I will go back to Samoa to live my final days and they will be with me too, to support me always.

4pm

YI SMALL, 50, DISABLED PERSONS ASSEMBLY BOARD MEMBER, TE PUKE

Yi Small is a married working mum who is also living with a disability, after she contracted polio as a child. Photo / Alan Gibson
Yi Small is a married working mum who is also living with a disability, after she contracted polio as a child. Photo / Alan Gibson

Yes, my voice is heard. I think I'm very out there, that's my attitude.

I have my opinion and I don't wait for people to say 'What do you think?'

5pm

BETHANY HUTT, 23, RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT, NELSON

Upon reflection, I do feel like my voice is heard, however it's a hard question.

In general, yes in my everyday life and work I think it's heard; to be honest it's something I have not given much thought to before now.

6pm

SHAYMAA ARIF, 23, REFUGEE RIGHTS ADVOCATE, AUCKLAND

Shaymaa Aris begins her afternoon commute home in busy Auckland. Photo / Doug Sherring
Shaymaa Aris begins her afternoon commute home in busy Auckland. Photo / Doug Sherring

My voice being heard doesn't matter while the voices of my people aren't heard.

I chose this because there are vulnerable people, struggling in unimaginable ways. I saw it myself when I was assisting in Greece and I felt my heart break when I saw my people being silenced and thrown to the side as if they were trash.

And now my two friends are arrested in Greece for rescuing refugees who have made their way from Izmir to Lesvos shorelines. And if they aren't heard, then I am not heard.

7pm

SISILIA ETEUATI, 39, LEGAL COUNSEL, AUCKLAND

Sisilia Eteuati, putting her children Tanifatea, 4, left, and Tigiilagi, 7, to bed, says sometimes other people get in the way of her voice being heard. Photo / Jason Oxenham
Sisilia Eteuati, putting her children Tanifatea, 4, left, and Tigiilagi, 7, to bed, says sometimes other people get in the way of her voice being heard. Photo / Jason Oxenham

My voice is a Samoan woman's voice, a voice of a single mother, the voice of a lawyer and a writer.

My experience as to whether I'm heard too often depends on people's perceptions and bias about when and how much voices such as mine should speak and the way in which we should do so.

While it is encouraging to see increased Pasifika representation in the halls of power, there is still so much more that needs to be done in politics, in arts and culture, in addressing our higher gender wage gap and in everyday life to ensure Pasifika women and our diverse voices are heard.

8pm

TINA STEPHENS, 42, RETAIL MANAGER, ROTORUA

Waikite rugby player Tina Stephens' voice is heard on the field, but not on the marae. Photo / Stephen Parker / Rotorua Daily Post
Waikite rugby player Tina Stephens' voice is heard on the field, but not on the marae. Photo / Stephen Parker / Rotorua Daily Post

Yes and no.

Yes: It is not only a right but a responsibility. Who governs our country is dependent on our vote. I hope voting becomes compulsory in New Zealand.

No: Te Arawa where I am born and bred prohibits women to speak on a marae, yet my iwi Ngapuhi does not. To me this protocol is a reflection of the fact that women are not valued.

Who has more influence over governing this - male or female?

9pm

MIHAD-HODAN ISMAIL YUSUF, 22, VICTORIA UNIVERSITY STUDENT, WELLINGTON

Victoria University student Mihad-Hodan Ismail Yusuf says the voice of black Muslim women is not being heard at all. Photo / Supplied
Victoria University student Mihad-Hodan Ismail Yusuf says the voice of black Muslim women is not being heard at all. Photo / Supplied

I do believe we have come a very long way since the suffrage gave women the right to vote, but with saying that there are still many, many issues we still face today.

As a young black Muslim women, I personally don't believe my voice or the voices of black Muslim women, not just in New Zealand but around the world, are being heard at all.

The suffrage was an incredibly great movement and has changed the lives of many women but how often do we ask ourselves "Did that impact also include/affect the lives of other minority women?"

10pm

DONOGH REES, 58, ACTRESS, AUCKLAND

Actress Donogh Rees is appearing in the play Cradle Song this month, but says opportunities are not what they should be for older actresses in New Zealand. Photo / Michael Craig
Actress Donogh Rees is appearing in the play Cradle Song this month, but says opportunities are not what they should be for older actresses in New Zealand. Photo / Michael Craig

Firstly, the parameters to answer in only two or three sentences makes it hard to express the whirlwind of answers in my head.

Secondly, within my industry I do not see women within my age bracket being
visible/vocal and fully dimensional on screen or on stage in NZ productions.

And thirdly women being back into the workforce, post-having children (through necessity) is taking away our voice in bringing up our own and thereby muffling their voices too.

11pm

BETH EYNON-RICHARDS, 54, BOUTIQUE WOOL SHOP OWNER, AUCKLAND

Beth Eynon-Richards, pictured out for dinner with her husband in Ponsonby, says older women are treated as if they're
Beth Eynon-Richards, pictured out for dinner with her husband in Ponsonby, says older women are treated as if they're "invisible". Photo / Jason Oxenham

As a woman of this age, actually I feel increasingly disillusioned and less seen.

For me I feel that I'm highly educated and professionally trained, I'm aware, I'm involved, but because I've got grey hair I'm invisible.

I've got a life of valuable experience and yet I've got no place to express it because I'm not in the boardroom anymore.