The identity of a doctor who admitted covertly filming women in the toilets of Nelson Hospital can finally be revealed.

Samuel John Simpson Wilson first appeared in the Nelson District Court on eight charges of making an intimate visual recording in 2015.

He pleaded guilty in January this year and was later sentenced to seven months' home detention.

The High Court has upheld the District Court's decision to decline granting him permanent name suppression and released its judgment today.

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Wilson was formerly a cardiologist at Nelson Hospital but is no longer working as a doctor.

Between June 2012 and August 2014, Wilson used a miniature recording device to film nine women using a changing room and toilet at Nelson Hospital.

Using the same device, Wilson also covertly recorded two female visitors using the bathroom at his home.

On another occasion, he used the device to film up a colleague's skirt when he was sitting next to her.

Justice Collins said that eight of the victims opposed name suppression.

"They cite amongst other reasons the inappropriateness of him obtaining permanent name suppression when he violated their dignity and privacy."

Two of Wilson's victims did not oppose his continued name suppression.

"The victim impact statements explain how many of the women have suffered
stress and anxiety over Dr Wilson's behaviour," Justice Collins said.

"The victims have said how they felt dehumanised and angry over the breach of trust inherent in Dr Wilson's offending."

Justice Collins dismissed each of the five grounds of appeal advanced on behalf of Wilson.

Wilson was formerly a cardiologist at Nelson Hospital but is no longer working as a doctor. Photo / via Facebook
Wilson was formerly a cardiologist at Nelson Hospital but is no longer working as a doctor. Photo / via Facebook

"While accepting that naming the doctor would inevitably cause distress for his family, this fell well short of the threshold of extreme hardship set out in s 200 (2) (a) of the [Criminal Procedure] Act."

Justice Collins also found a discretionary factor which weighed heavily against the continued suppression of Wilson's name was that it would unfairly cast a cloud of suspicion over many "Nelson health professionals".