I'd like to see some political opposition. Any would do, because this Government is getting a very easy ride. Possibly it's the due date of June 17 for Jacinda Ardern's baby, but everyone is treading super, super gently.

Let's take a look at the past few months.

The I's weren't dotted, the T's weren't crossed over the future of the oil and gas exploration industry. Despite Megan Woods' spin, it didn't go through Cabinet, there was precious little consultation, and it's almost impossible to imagine National doing this and Labour letting them off the hook so lightly.

Then there are the meth houses. Now, this is a bit easier to fathom; National decided that the houses were dangerous on the advice of ESR, which contributed in a small way, to a housing shortage. But still, anything from National? Nah, nothing.

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Possibly it's the due date of June 17 for Jacinda Ardern's baby, but everyone is treading super, super gently. Photo / Getty Images
Possibly it's the due date of June 17 for Jacinda Ardern's baby, but everyone is treading super, super gently. Photo / Getty Images

Mycoplasma bovis; there was everything from "it's now unbeatable let's just live with it" a fortnight ago to "let's slaughter 150,000 cows, despite what the farmers think".

Farmers like National, National likes farmers; where are its alternatives, its ideas no matter how off the wall? There just haven't been any.

As if to underline the MIA opposition, a former national prime minister was appointed to steer the coalition working group on employment relations.

It's a cheap shot, but couldn't Bridges and co have spun that to their advantage? Instead, they've done the opposite, saying he's old school national and not the man for the future of workplace relations.

So to recap, the only one seemingly pushing back against this Government is the Fred Astaire of politics, David Seymour. Or could it all fire up once Winston Peters takes the reins on June 18?

For all our sakes, you'd like to think so.