Rotorua will get its share of more than 300 jobs expected to come from the resurrection of a New Zealand forestry service based in the city.

It "makes sense" the service, named Te Uru Rākau, is based in Rotorua, according to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.

Ardern, along with Forestry Minister Shane Jones, Associate Forestry Minister Meka Whaitiri, New Zealand First deputy leader Fletcher Tabuteau and Waiariki MP Tamati Coffey, was in the city today for the unveiling of the service's name and new branding.

She said the announcement was one way to "reinvigorate the regions".

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"This is the place for this agency. This is where it belongs and I feel quite strongly about that.

"The whole idea of having it based here is so we can bring it to the heart of where the forestry industry really is.

#LIVE: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Forestry Minister Shane Jones making an announcement in Rotorua.

Posted by Rotorua Daily Post on Thursday, 10 May 2018

"We want to make sure we're doing our work co-ordinating more investment in forestry, support for private forestry owners, more work done to try convert land, and that should be happening in the exact place where forestry really is key and Rotorua is one of those places."

Ardern said Te Uru Rākau would focus on growing the country's forestry sector, building a strong labour market and lifetime careers, and creating one vision for the Government's one billion trees programme.

"All of this will enhance New Zealand's reputation in forestry and restore confidence in our regions," she said.

"I grew up among the trees and I want the next generation of New Zealanders to grow up among the trees again because that means that they will be growing up with jobs, that means that they will be watching as we fulfil our climate change obligation and it means that they will be growing among native species again."

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Jones estimated there would be well over 300 jobs created by the service, some in Wellington and some in Rotorua, but could not confirm how many exactly.

"My focus is bringing our young people forward and enabling them to build a successful career in the sector," Jones said.

Forestry Minister Shane Jones, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Rotorua mayor Steve Chadwick, and Te Arawa kaumatua Monty Morrison plant a tree at the launch of Te Uru Rākau in Rotorua today. Photo/Stephen Parker
Forestry Minister Shane Jones, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Rotorua mayor Steve Chadwick, and Te Arawa kaumatua Monty Morrison plant a tree at the launch of Te Uru Rākau in Rotorua today. Photo/Stephen Parker

"New Zealand's old forestry service was disestablished in 1987 and in recent years our forestry sector has experienced decline but we're determined to shine the spotlight on forestry once more.

"Te Uru Rākau will build a strong and dedicated forestry presence in Rotorua, recognising that Rotorua is at the heart of the forestry sector in New Zealand. Forestry is our third largest export earner – with an annual gross income of about $5 billion – and has the potential to grow.

"I'm pleased to be able to announce today that Budget 2018 will set aside $15 million of operating funds to boost the capability of the new service, enabling it to work with landowners, provide forestry expertise and deliver on the Government's forestry objectives."

New Zealand First deputy leader Fletcher Tabuteau welcomed the launch.

"As an MP based in Rotorua, I'm particularly happy to see our region's proud forestry industry once again put in the spotlight," Tabuteau said.

"New Zealand First has been clear in its determination to return prosperity to the regions and strengthen the forestry industry, a sector which has great potential for growth."

Waiariki MP Tamati Coffey said today's announcement showed key government departments could be outside of Auckland and Wellington.

"As the local Waiariki MP, I am proud to be part of this coalition Government's promise to get things moving for one of our region's most dominant industries.

"A promise delivered, which will lead to jobs for our people, for Māori, and for our entire region."

Coffey said he would be working to ensure other 'forgotten' forestry towns like Kaingaroa and Murupara were also part of the forestry industry's current growth.