The rare super blue blood moon put on a spectacular show for the country's photographers and stargazers from last night through to this morning.

But while some parts of the country saw the spectacle unobstructed, in other areas the weather change bringing clouds and rain wreaked havoc with only short glimpses offered to those keen enough to wait around.

From 12.50am the partial eclipse was to begin, with the moon turning slightly red. That was to last until 4.11am.

From 1.51am the total moon eclipse was to begin, making the moon completely red, and ending about 3.07am.

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The supermoon and partial eclipse, captured by Tim Sunga in Kawerau. Photo / Tim Sunga
The supermoon and partial eclipse, captured by Tim Sunga in Kawerau. Photo / Tim Sunga

Tim Sunga of Kawerau captured the supermoon and partial eclipse - and was lucky enough to catch a few minutes of the blood moon, before rain set in.

In much of Auckland cloud obstructed the views, with only short glimpses offered throughout the night.

Craig Rogers took a clear shot of the blue moon northwest of Auckland at Woodhill Forest.

The blood moon over Woodhill Forest. Photo / Craig Rogers
The blood moon over Woodhill Forest. Photo / Craig Rogers

A supermoon is a particularly close full or new moon, appearing somewhat brighter and bigger. A total lunar eclipse — or blood moon for its reddish tinge — has the moon completely bathed in Earth's shadow.

Janet Akhurst of Napier put three photos of the blood moon together to create this image. Photo / Janet Akhurst
Janet Akhurst of Napier put three photos of the blood moon together to create this image. Photo / Janet Akhurst

The combination of a blue moon, a supermoon and a total lunar eclipse all on the same night has not happened since 1886, and will not occur again until 2037.

The spectacle was visible across the Pacific into Asia on Wednesday night as the moon rose, and into the early hours of today.

Three photos of the full moon placed together, as seen from Napier this morning. Photo / Janet Akhurst
Three photos of the full moon placed together, as seen from Napier this morning. Photo / Janet Akhurst

Peter Felhofer, president of the Northland Astronomical Society, said the moon would be a spectacular sight for those who did see it.

''It's particularly exciting that the lunar eclipse is happening on a super moon and the moon is expected to be anything from a deep red to purple, so it should be quite a sight for those who do see it."

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