A 58-tonne electric freight truck, electric buses and developing an electric campervan for tourism are among the initiatives to receive a share of $3.74 million from the Government.

Twenty projects were announced today in the latest round of the Low Emission Vehicles Contestable Fund, administered by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority. The funding is being matched by $4.3m from the recipients.

A large proportion of the Government money - $1.7m - is for more charging stations nationwide, including at Foodstuffs supermarkets and golf courses nationwide, Fisher and Paykel stores, Wilson Parking buildings mainly in Auckland, and the Cloudy Bay vineyard in Blenheim.

Local authorities will also receive funding for charging stations in Taranaki, Waikato and the King Country.

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"This is really about making sure we've got coverage around the country in terms of infrastructure," Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods said during the announcement.

"A big part of what we need to do to up the uptake of electric vehicles in New Zealand is to make sure we don't have people stranded, running out of juice."

Tourism Holdings will receive $402,000 to convert an electric van into a campervan, aiming to have 20 electric campervans on the road within a year.

"New Zealand sells itself to the world as a clean, green paradise," Woods said.

"One of the things people will be attracted to is the ability to do their trip in a sustainable way. It's got huge potential and it's the way we want to sell ourselves to the rest of the world."

The Motor Tourism Training Organisation will receive $95,000 to develop a qualifications framework for technicians working on electric vehicles.

There is currently no NZQA-registered qualification for this work, and Woods said the new framework will be critical in preparing the workforce for the transition to a low-carbon economy.

Electric freight vehicles also had potential to cut into domestic carbon emissions, and a $500,000 grant will go to CODA, in partnership with Zero Emission Vehicles and Bay Dairy, to design and build a 58-tonne electric freight truck for Fonterra.

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The announcement was made at Zealandia eco-sanctuary in Wellington, which will receive $118,137 to replace its diesel buses with two electric mini-buses.

"It's all about reducing emissions, sure, but it's all about the liveability of our cities, the places where we live, and the healthiness of them," Zealandia chief executive Paul Atkins said.

Woods said the funding was conditional until contracts are prepared and signed.

"The projects we are funding show there's an electric vehicle for almost every job or use in New Zealand, be it delivering fruit and veg or taking a holiday."

Labour's coalition agreement with New Zealand First includes a promise to have the Government's vehicle fleet, where practicable, emissions-free by 2025/26.

Woods said the progress of that work will depend on existing Government contracts.

Other funding recipients include:
• Evincible - $263,450 - to co-ordinate the rollout of a battery electric courtesy car and associated charging station for 25 automotive workshops, giving people the chance to test drive an EV while their car is being repaired or serviced.
• Tranzit Group - $397,500 - to invest in permanent drive-through charging stations for buses at the Wellington Railway Station bus interchange, capable of charging four buses simultaneously.
Ohomairangi Trust - $75,000 - to buy six EVs for its teachers, therapists and specialists to use visiting whanau.
Kerikeri Village Trust - $67,250 - to buy four EVs to establish a car share operation for use by residents and staff and install a public charging unit in Kerikeri.