No story with Winston Peters at the centre of it was ever going to be a one-day wonder.

And it just got a whole lot more serious.

There are disturbing and unanswered questions about his superannuation overpayment, whether you think he is the victim of a media beat-up, or are not willing to accept his assurance it was an error without proof.

The Government is now at the centre of the controversy after an admission by Social Development Minister Anne Tolley to the Herald.

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She said she was told on August 15 by an official about MSD's private meeting with Peters and what the subject of the meeting was - well after the meeting, well after he had paid back the money.

She was technically told under the "no surprises" policy, in which the public service chiefs and SOE boards forewarn ministers of issues that could suddenly become news and which will require their response. The "and" is important.

The fact that Tolley is unwilling to discuss the issue any further because it is a private matter is evidence enough that she should not have been told in the first place.

It is an abuse of the no-surprises policy. No minister should have been privy to that sort of information any more than the Health Minister should receive reports on any hip replacement operation Peters might have.

If Tolley had no expectation of receiving such information, she should say so publicly and conclude that the ministry's decision was a misjudgment.

If she doesn't, it is safe to assume that she and ministers have created an expectation they should get information like that.

What Tolley did with the information is not yet clear, nor how far up the chain it went and whether National's black ops guys are back in business.

But the very fact it was fed to the Beehive will cause suspicion by Peters that National leaked the information to discredit him.

In the end it could discredit National and damage its relationship with the party that may decide whether it gets a fourth term or not.