Talk focused on improving the future and new sustainable ways of living are circling in the air.

In New Zealand, a strong enough movement for vegetarianism has triggered significant demand for a number of vegetarian and vegan retailers to set up.

The hot trend of "veganuary" has caused many to jump on board and make the transition to a plant-based way of life.

Rachel Hawkins, the Australian dietician and nutritionist behind The Naked Truth, a website which aims to be a trusted source of food and nutrition information, has revealed what cutting meat from your diet entirely, will do to your body.

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"Transitioning from an omnivorous diet - a diet that includes meat and other animal products - to a vegan diet can be a difficult task, so it is important to ask yourself the reason why before making any change to your diet," she told the Daily Mail Australia.

On her website, Hawkins has shared important facts you need to know before making the change, and emphasises the importance of doing your research.

What we eat gives us life, so it's wise to give it at least a bit of consideration.

Veganism myths are thrown around with a plethora of pros and cons, so Hawkins has shared what truly needs to be paid attention to.

For people going in with the intention of weight loss, she suggests you should maybe think again.

Nutrients and supplements

When making the change, one can suffer from the loss of essential nutrients which can have serious consequences.

The four which need to be closely monitored are iron, vitamin B12, calcium and omega-3 fat.

"If a persons intake of these key nutrients decreases, then serious health concerns can arise overtime," she said.

The four nutrients needing special attention on vegan diet
1. Iron
• A lack of iron can cause anaemia which makes one tired and have a bad concentration span.
• People need to make sure they eat plant-based irons like whole grains and legumes. Noting they aren't as easily absorbed as the equivalent in meat so she says to not drink tea and coffee while you're eating as they can block the body's absorption.

2. Vitamin B12
• This keeps your central nervous system in check, which relates to issues in your gut, which is critical to overall health.
• Vitamin B is only found naturally in animal products, so it's important to take supplements for this.

3. Calcium
• It's essential for developing and maintaining strong bones.
• She says there are many good plant sources for calcium: "calcium-fortified soy or almond milks, hard tofu, almonds, unhulled tahini (sesame seed paste) and green leafy vegetables like kale and Asian greens including bok choy and Chinese broccoli."

4. Omega-3-fats
• They're important for eye, nerve and brain development.
• "Plant sources of omega-3 fats include linseeds/flaxseeds, walnuts, chia seeds, soy bean oil and canola oil," she says.

When cutting out meat, there are some nutrients you need to make sure you get enough of. Photo / Getty Images
When cutting out meat, there are some nutrients you need to make sure you get enough of. Photo / Getty Images

Acclimatising

Hawkins says going cold turkey can be a challenge, and enough to turn someone away after their initial attempt.

To combat this, she says meal planning is the key, and to transition yourself into the process slowly.

"Vegan diets are more complex than just simply eating more plant foods. They require planning and discipline and present many social challenges, especially when it comes to eating out or attending social gatherings," she said.

Hawkins says that planning is essential when it comes to a vegan diet so you don't find it too challenging. Photo / Getty Images
Hawkins says that planning is essential when it comes to a vegan diet so you don't find it too challenging. Photo / Getty Images

Gut Health

Nowadays, many health issues can be traced back to the gut.

Due to vegan diets and their heavy plant basis, a lot of fibre is consumed.

"Increasing your fibre intake too quickly can cause stomach irritation such as bloating, excess wind and constipation, so increase your intake of plant-based foods slowly and remember to drink lots of water to help reduce these potential side effects," she said.

Benefits

If done wisely, Hawkins says the changed way of eating can have a range of benefits for one's health.

Veganism is proven to assist with reducing blood pressure, decreasing heart disease and type two diabetes, due to some of the properties of the nutrients in the foods.

High fruit and vegetable consumption also assists with the prevention of inflammatory diseases.

"They also contain antioxidants and phytochemicals which are well known for their anti-inflammatory properties," she said.

Yet, she made it clear she's not sure it's the best diet, and the lines are blurred surrounding the question of how long it takes to begin reaping the benefits.

If done wisely, veganism can proven to assist with reducing blood pressure, decreasing hear disease and type 2 diabetes. Photo / Getty Images
If done wisely, veganism can proven to assist with reducing blood pressure, decreasing hear disease and type 2 diabetes. Photo / Getty Images

Overall

Hawkins says that labelling yourself a vegan won't instantly reap these outcomes, but fuelling yourself with more plant-based foods is a very good idea.

'Finally, my advice for those wanting to adopt a vegan diet is to do your research, know your 'why' and seek the help of a nutrition professional to support your safe transition to a vegan lifestyle,."