Social media users were infuriated last night over a "pompous" and picky couple on the Australian home show, Buying Blind.

Viewers were outraged when Sydney pair Mags and Tyson handed the show a 26-item list of demands in seeking a home, including a mid-century modern "art deco" vibe and personalised vases.

"The real estate market in Sydney is horrible," chirps Tyson. "You're just watching the houses get further and further out of your reach."

"It's volatile, and hard, and we've never done it before," adds Mags.

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The thing that really grinded people's gears in this tale of woe? The pair had a budget of $1.8 million. That's, like, 180,000 smashed avocados on toast.

People took to social media to slam the precious pair, saying they were "fussy as hell", "annoyingly smug" and far from struggling with their hefty first-home budget.

Other Twitter users called Nine out for producing such an unrealistic show, saying no "real" aspiring homeowner could relate to it.

The median house price in Sydney is currently more than $1.1 million, and is set to hit $2 million by 2028 unless the market changes.

Buying Blind sees prospective homebuyers who've been priced out of the market handing over their life savings to a panel of experts and trusting them to do what they've been unable to: Buy them their dream home.

The show has proved controversial in previous episodes, with users slamming the renovations as "unrealistic" for the budgets given, and calling on the network to be transparent about how much money went into it.

We approached the Nine Network last week asking for information about how much the renovations to the property had cost, and whether those costs fell outside the couple's budget.

They provided us with this statement, attributed to an Endemol Shine spokesperson:

"Along with each couple's renovation budget and their own personal belongings, Buying Blind's experts used their considerable industry contacts to deliver extra value to the buyers in order to make each house a home to be enjoyed for many years to come."