Chip lovers will be able to enjoy their favourite snack without the guilt, as Bluebird manufacturer PepsiCo announces it's changing the cooking oil used in all its major brands.

Bluebird is switching to canola oil, with the promise that will mean a lot less saturated fat in treats like Bluebird Original Cut potato chips, Rashuns, Twisties and Burger Rings.

The amount of satured fat will drop by as much as 85 per cent in some brands, with the company saying it wants to cut down on fat, sodium, and sugars.

PepsiCo New Zealand general manager Ali Hamza said it was a significant milestone for the company.

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"We're proud to be rolling out this change in New Zealand to many of our great snack brands like Bluebird and Doritos. Consumer needs and preferences are changing, and Kiwis are more concerned about their health and wellness than ever before."

The switch will mean more than 90 per cent of PepsiCo's snack portfolio meets its 2025 global goal to reduce saturated fat to 1.1 grams per 100 calories.

"The team has been making several changes to our portfolio, products and packaging to ensure we can meet our consumers' needs," Hamza says.

"We are committed to reformulating our products without compromising on taste! We also want to make it easier for consumers to make informed choices for themselves and their families."

He says the company have been working to give consumers healthier options and meet high food quality and safety standards, including rolling out a health star rating on its Bluebird snack brand packaging.

Herald food and nutrition columnist Niki Bezzant said PepsiCo was bringing its products into line with "some of the better chips that are already on the market".

"It also makes me wonder: Were they using palm oil before? We often see 'vegetable oil' on ingredients lists which can be a term that hides the use of palm oil. On the chips I looked at when I did a brief survey of the shelves, only a few actually state 'palm oil outright. Palm oil is high in saturated fat an also has sustainability and ethical issues, as we know.

"It's important to note too that this doesn't make these chips and snacks health food. Even made with healthier oil, they're still perfect little fat, refined carb and salt packages that are irresistible, energy dense and really easy to over-eat.

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"I still love my potato chips (they're one of my favourite treats!) but I'll still be eating them sparingly and looking for ones where the fat being used is specified, and doesn't just say 'vegetable oil'."

The new recipe chips will start reaching shelves in mid-December, with the corn-based products arriving next Feburary.