The Chase star Paul Sinha has been diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease at the age of 49.

The comedian and quiz expert gave a health update via his Twitter page on Friday, vowing to 'fight with every breath I have', reports the Daily Mail.

Sinha was here in May for the Comedy Festival where he performed a series of sell-out shows. In his blog post he describes the experience as "the comedy month of my life".

Writing of his diagnosis, which you can read in full below, he said, "Nonetheless my reaction was not one of shock. I spent May this year in New Zealand simultaneously having the comedy month of my life, and worrying about why a right-sided limp was now getting worse.

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Behind the facade of the cheerful, late night comedy festival drunk was a man deeply scared about facing the truth when back in the UK. It has been a really, really tough two weeks."

Expanding further in an impassioned blog post, the television personality said he was initially 'in shock', but 'feels far more prepared for the new challenges ahead' now he has a treatment plan in place.

Displaying he trademark humour, he also joked that a Dancing On Ice appearance is now 'out of the question', before thanking his family and fiancé for their support in the wake of his diagnosis.

Sinha - who has been the fourth chaser, known as 'The Sinnerman', since 2011 - admits it has 'been a really, really tough two weeks' since he got the diagnosis but now he has a treatment plan in place he feels 'prepared for the new challenges ahead'.

Parkinson's is a condition in which parts of the brain become progressively damaged.

The three main symptoms are: involuntary shaking (tremor), slow movement, stiff and inflexible muscles.

As the condition progresses, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease can get worse.

Parkinson's disease doesn't directly cause people to die, but the condition can place great strain on the body.

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Following his announcement, Sinha was flooded with support from followers and stars in a touching display of affection.

Fellow comedian David Baddiel honoured Sinha, as he wrote: 'Sorry to hear this Paul. Give it hell', while Dave Gorman wrote: 'Sorry to hear it. Sending love and strength your way. X'

Responding to Sinha's announcement, Steve Ford, Chief Executive of Parkinson's UK, said: 'Paul Sinha bravely speaking about his Parkinson's diagnosis, and the journey he has been on to get to this point, will do so much to raise awareness of this much misunderstood condition...

'With more than 40 symptoms, Parkinson's undoubtedly throws up new challenges, but with the right treatment and support we can help people to take control of their lives with this unpredictable condition...

'Paul's determination to live well with Parkinson's is mirrored by an incredibly passionate Parkinson's community, determined both to find new and better treatments but also to not let Parkinson's hold them back...

'We wish Paul all the best with his future projects.'

Devoted fans also honoured the TV star, as users penned: 'Runs in my family, wishing you all the best... Good luck Paul... Bless you sir, all the best in that you do. My wife were diagnosed about 10 years ago, it's a toughy...

'Good Luck Paul. If you treat this like the chase you will win. Hope you do... So sorry to hear about your diagnosis...

'I was diagnosed early onset 3 years ago. Keep up your sense of humour and positive thinking as well as the meds and I'm sure you'll be ok. There are worse things to have!... Oh no! So sorry to hear that...

'Reckon you are a tough one Paul and #Parkinsons better watch out!... You were brilliant when I saw your comedy tour earlier this year. I'm really sorry to hear this news and I can see that you're already facing it with resilience, grace and wit.'

Jenny Ryan, Paul Sinha and Anne Hegerty of The Chase attend the National Television Awards 2018
Jenny Ryan, Paul Sinha and Anne Hegerty of The Chase attend the National Television Awards 2018

In January, Paul revealed he had become engaged to his partner, as he took to Twitter to reveal he had popped the question as he penned: 'I proposed today. He said yes. Thus starts yet another diet.'

The proposal comes two years after the quiz expert said in an interview with Guys Like U: 'Marriage is not for me either. I am passionately in support of it but it's not for me. I couldn't put my Hindu parents through the rigmarole of gay marriage'.

Fans flooded the microblogging site with support for the TV personality when he shared the sweet announcement with his 97,100 followers.

Upon revealing news of his romance, Paul admitted they were in an open relationship, saying: 'We are in an open relationship, but can't say more than that...

'One of the advantages of being gay is that there is no traditional template for how you are meant to engage with your partner...

'Hetero relationships are based on the idea of procreation and offering a loving environment for your children, therefore by definition would mean monogamy.'

Comedian and star of The Chase Paul Sinha.
Comedian and star of The Chase Paul Sinha.

Of his parents' views on his relationship, he also said: 'They have been so amazing and so great and so supportive – when I told them I had a boyfriend they were like "Thank the lord for that!"'

Paul's sexuality has been widely discussed by fans and himself, as he admitted what was deemed his 'coming out' on TV was nothing of the sort as he had always been open about the fact he was gay yet no one picked up on the news.

He previously spoke about how he is perceived through his sexuality: 'It's just weird how people perceive you...

'They say homosexuality is the love that dare not speak its name, but I've been speaking its name relentlessly now for quite a long time and it seems like only because I've 'come out' on The Chase is anybody actually starting to listen, which I find really weird...

'I'd love to think my voice is distinctive and interesting, in terms of that I bring a matter-of-fact version of the gay story...

'Un-flamboyant, un-camp... I wouldn't go as far as to say butch, that would be ludicrous... but very matter of fact and frank, and I think it's an interesting take on the tale, and yet, somehow it feels as if my face doesn't quite fit...

'I never get invited to gay awards ceremonies, I don't get invited to gay anything to be perfectly honest with you. It's almost as if there's some sort of perception that I'm not one of the team. I don't really know where that comes from.'

Paul Sinha attends the 2019 'TRIC Awards' on March 12, 2019 in London, England. Photo by Getty Images
Paul Sinha attends the 2019 'TRIC Awards' on March 12, 2019 in London, England. Photo by Getty Images

Paul's brave announcement in full

On the evening of Thursday May 30th, an experienced consultant neurologist calmly informed me that I had Parkinson's disease.

It was a devastating denouement to a medical odyssey that began in September 2017 with a sudden-onset, frozen right shoulder, and took in an unexpected diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes, a lifestyle transformation that enabled me to lose two stone, and a shoulder operation in January this year.

Nonetheless my reaction was not one of shock. I spent May this year in New Zealand simultaneously having the comedy month of my life, and worrying about why a right-sided limp was now getting worse.

Behind the facade of the cheerful, late night comedy festival drunk was a man deeply scared about facing the truth when back in the UK. It has been a really, really tough two weeks.

Cancelling my run at the Edinburgh Fringe, missing the World Quizzing Championships to have brain scans, performing club sets whilst emotionally bewildered, and of course working my way through my loved ones, delivering the bad news.

With the diagnosis now confirmed, and a treatment plan in place, I now feel far more prepared for the new challenges ahead.

I have an amazing family, no strangers to serious medical illness, I'm blessed to have a fiancé who is there for me, and I have a multitude of friends and colleagues whom I consider to be exceptional human beings.

I don't consider myself unlucky, and whatever the next stage of my life holds for me, many others have it far worse.

In the time since my Parkinson's started I have been ludicrously busy, and fully intend to keep Chasing, keep writing and performing comedy, keep quizzing and keep being hopeless at Tasks.

Dancing on Ice is, I suspect, out of the question. A lot of people have asked "What can I do to help ?" The answer is to treat me exactly the same as before. Much love, Paul