Dishwasher protocol

"If you put knives sharp end down into the basket then you will soon cut holes in the basket's base as the water spray wriggles them around," advises Peter. "You will then find that eventually the holes get to the stage that you need to buy a new basket as your cutlery is falling through the holes.When you visit your retailer store for a replacement of what looks like a very cheap moulded plastic basket you will be somewhat shocked to find out that it can cost well in excess of $100 to replace. In my case $135 was quoted but luckily for me I found a similar one in an op shop for $5. I now always put my knives in the basket handles down."

Egyptians sock it

The ancient Egyptians were early adopters of the stripy sock. Photo / Supplied
The ancient Egyptians were early adopters of the stripy sock. Photo / Supplied

The ancient Egyptians were an innovative lot; they built the pyramids and invented paper, but were also early adopters of the striped sock. Scientists at the British Museum have discovered through new imaging technology how Egyptians used dyes on a child's sock, recovered from a rubbish dump in ancient Antinoupolis and dating from 300AD. Egyptians were plain coloured knitted socks pioneers, styling them with one compartment for the big toe and another for the four toes to wear with sandals.

Revenge for spoilers?

Frustrated when his colleague kept on telling him the ending of books, a scientist in Antarctica went postal: Sergey Savitsky, 55, and Oleg Beloguzov, 52, read to pass the hours during four harsh years together. But Savitsky became angry after Beloguzov kept telling him the endings, it is alleged. The victim is now in intensive care after being flown from Russia's Bellingshausen research station on King George Island to Chile with a knife injury to his heart. Savitsky is now under arrest under what is believed to be the first attempted murder in Antarctica.

NZ coin commemorates World War I's end

A reader received this coin in change and thought it neat. Photo / Supplied
A reader received this coin in change and thought it neat. Photo / Supplied

A reader received this coin and thought it neat. It commemorates the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, the signing of the Armistice. He says "maybe its release into circulation should have gotten more publicity, after a retail worker refused it as 'a foreign coin.'"

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