The language of Shakespeare – how it has haunted many a young high school student trying to understand the way people spoke some 400 years ago.

So, spare a thought for the actors signed up to the fourth season of Pop-up Globe who have to learn the lines featuring words not spoken for centuries and deliver them with the right rhythm. But, as this video shows, they're having fun with learning what might as well be a whole new language.

Dave Fane:
Richard III: plays King Edweard IV and George, Duke of Clarence
The Taming of the Shrew: Gremio

What's the hardest thing about learning Shakespeare's language?
The hardest thing about learning Shakespeare is he didn't leave a YouTube video of how to do it.

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What's the best word you've come across?
The best word I've come across is "Milch - Kine" (Cow). I tried it in a conversation with a friend who's starting a business "Oh, that'll be a great little cash Milch -Kine."

Kirsty Bruce
Richard III: Dorset, Tyrell and a price
The Taming of the Shrew: Tranio

What's the hardest thing about learning Shakespeare's language?
Unlearning it! I find that once I've learnt blank verse text, the rhythm of it becomes stuck to my breath, heart and it gets kind of embedded in me. So if a director needs to make cuts (which is oft required!), trying to remove phrases from a speech is harder to process than learning it.

What's the best word you've come across?
Shog! [It means to move along]. I also think the phrase "hair up-staring" is great. I often say, 'shall we shog?' Translation: Shall we go!

Harry Bradley
Richard III: Duke of Buckingham
The Taming of the Shrew: Christopher Sly

What's the hardest thing about learning Shakespeare's language?
The big words are easy. It's the small ones that'll get you. Is it shall or will? But or yet? You or thou? Will I ever know?

What's the best word you've come across?
Bawcock. Which means fine fellow. A delightful way to describe anyone you like. Also, Bulls-pizzle, which is a delightful way to describe someone you don't like. For example, "Thanks for you seeing the show, you bawcock." "Didn't see the show? Your loss, you Bull's-pizzle."

Amy Usherwood
Richard III: Rivers, Herbert
The Taming of the Shrew: Biondello

What's the hardest thing about learning Shakespeare's language?
Being that annoying person who references Shakespeare in regular life.

What's the best word you've come across?
Either, "Shall we shog?" or a "kickie-wickie" which means a critical or disrespectful wife. But, I think in 2018 it could apply to husbands also. "Shall we shog? Methinks my kickie-wickie wouldst wail if I tarry."