Ben Stokes' controversial last-over six during the Cricket World Cup final sparked heartbreak for New Zealanders across the nation.

But while Black Caps fans have slowly come to terms with things, one Kiwi punter is still feeling the hurt after being denied a $1575 return from Sportsbet over the classification of Stokes' six.

The punter placed a $12 four-leg multi-bet with Sportsbet, with the first three legs betting Simona Halep to win the women's singles final against Serena Williams, and for Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer to win their respective men's singles semifinals in four sets at Wimbledon.

All three were successful, however, the last leg for England to score the most sixes, as well as the World Cup, was deemed lost.

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Both sides hit two regulation sixes but England scored six runs - two normal runs plus four overthrows - off the third last ball after it hit Stokes' bat and deflected to the boundary for four.

New Zealand players Martin Guptill and Ish Sodhi react after losing the Final of the ICC Cricket World Cup. Photo / Getty
New Zealand players Martin Guptill and Ish Sodhi react after losing the Final of the ICC Cricket World Cup. Photo / Getty

The Kiwi punter claims the six should've been counted toward his bet, therefore, earning him a $1575 return.

The punter, who has asked not to be named, raised the matter with Sportsbet but was told a six only counted if it was hit over the boundary.

With currently no reference to the rule under the "Team to hit the most sixes/Team to hit the most sixes and win the match" subheading on the terms and conditions page on Sportsbet's website, the Kiwi fan has argued the company's guidelines are ambiguous.

Under bets about a six being scored in a specific over, however, it states that "for the avoidance of doubt players running six and boundaries which are counted as extras do not count for this market."

Sportsbet are reportedly looking further into the matter.

Meanwhile, Sportsbet refunded more than 11,000 punters for bets on both the head to head and outright tournament markets due to the controversial finish of the grand final.