Privacy concerns caused the computerised eyewear to fail with the general public. But researchers believe it could help autistic children learn to recognise emotion and make eye contact.

When Esaïe Prickett sat down in the living room with his mother, father and four older brothers, he was the only one wearing Google Glass.

As Esaïe, who was 10 at the time and is 12 now, gazed through the computerised glasses, his family made faces — happy, sad, surprised, angry, bored — and he tried to identify each emotion. In an instant, the glasses told him whether he was right or

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