By all means stay up overnight to cheer Kane Williamson and his fellow Black Caps - hopefully - to glorious World Cup history. But make sure you get the OK from your boss to be late on Monday.

And don't just ring in sick in the morning as you might be risking your job.

Asked what Kiwi cricket fans absolutely should not do, employment lawyer Jennifer Mills says: "An employee ought not ring in sick on the morning and post something on social media showing them watching the match."

That could lead to the sick leave being deemed not to be genuine and that could amount to serious misconduct and warrant summary dismissal.

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"Employees are much better off being upfront and trying to get consent," says Mills.

Employers these days are much more attuned to work/life balance and likely to agree to a late start where possible, she says.

The exception is for businesses needing staff on deck at a certain time, though, even then shift swaps might be possible.

Unions and employers associations also think requests for late starts will be received sympathetically.

Ross Taylor, Trent Bolt and Kane Williamson. Illustration / Rod Emmerson
Ross Taylor, Trent Bolt and Kane Williamson. Illustration / Rod Emmerson

But John Ryall, assistant national secretary of one of the country's biggest unions, E tū, recommends pointing out that supporting the team in these circumstances is a patriotic duty.

"You are not staying up all night just to watch the cricket, you are supporting the country," says Ryall, a cricket diehard who in the earliest days of one-day internationals queued for hours for tickets to the Basin Reserve only to see Australia bowl New Zealand out for 74.

"I have had the ups and downs but when we are up we're up!"

"My own plan is to watch the match right through to the end and I have arranged with my employer to be late on Monday."

He advises those will similar plans to get the bosses agreement as early as possible.

"Tell them it's like the Millenium, you can only experience it once in a lifetime. So, please, give us a break."

Friends and family of the Black Caps after the team's Cricket World Cup semi final win. Photo / Photsport
Friends and family of the Black Caps after the team's Cricket World Cup semi final win. Photo / Photsport

The Employers and Manufacturers Association are urging employers to accommodate staff requests for late starts where possible.

"It's a one-in-four-year thing, and for New Zealand it is only the second time we have made the final in about 10 goes," says Alan McDonald, EMA's general manager, advocacy and strategy.

"I will be asking my staff to give me a break," says McDonald, who plans to stay up overnight.

He advises that employees get permission rather than turn up "late and bleary-eyed, or not at all".

While it might not attract as many viewers as a Rugby World Cup, it is our first summer sport.

Yes We Kane billboard, NZME. Billboard depicting kane williamson of the blackcaps. Photo / Michael Craig
Yes We Kane billboard, NZME. Billboard depicting kane williamson of the blackcaps. Photo / Michael Craig

"Some of the businesses that have large Indian workforces might be quite relieved that India didn't make it. Because they are fierce and passionate supports of their team.

McDonald suggests some of that passion be channelled towards the Black Caps - noise control officers be damned. "If shouting at the TV helps to get the Black Caps over the line, then that's good."

ANZ bank, longtime sponsor of the Black Caps and White Ferns, said staff are excited to watch the final and they will help them with their sleep deprivation at work with cakes and sausage rolls, courtesy of the CEO, "to bring the blood sugar levels back up".

While staff are expected in as the usual time they will make sure the coffee machines are fully loaded, an ANZ spokesman said.

The sailor's hat - a symbol of good luck for Kane Williamson in the CWC. Illustration / Rod Emmerson
The sailor's hat - a symbol of good luck for Kane Williamson in the CWC. Illustration / Rod Emmerson

NZME, of which the New Zealand Herald is part, is allowing staff to begin work at 10am where possible.

This of course doesn't include our reporters covering the match. They, you can be assured, will be working overtime.

The Black Caps reached Sunday's final - their second appearance in successive World Cup finals - after a heart-stopping and unexpected 18-run win over pre-tournament favourites India in Manchester last week.

India had also finished the round-robin phase of the tournament as the highest-ranked team, with the Black Caps securing the final semi spot ahead of Pakistan on a run-rate count back.

Meanwhile, England overcame five time champions Australia with an emphatic eight-wicket win at Edgbaston.

Neither New Zealand or England have won the World Cup.

The final will be played at the home the cricket, Lord's in London. This will be the fifth time that Lord's has hosted the World Cup final.

Play commences 9.30pm tonight.