Tui Cordeman had hit rock bottom but if you ask her today, the humble millionaire would be able to pinpoint the exact moment she managed to turn her drug-addicted life around.

Even during the early days of launching her now successful business, Koh Living, with her friend Nyree Hibberd, Cordeman was at the point of no return.

Koh Living's mission is to provide meaningful gifts to help connect friends and family and strengthen emotional relationships, reports news.com.au.

"I found that Koh Living's core mission has given me purpose and allowed me to give up addiction and thrive," Cordeman said.

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"When someone gives a gift that is tailored, it provides a sense of belonging and helps them feel appreciated and recognised," she said, adding her experiences helped shape the core and meaning of the business.

But it wasn't an easy journey. The pair spent the first five years of the business battling their addiction. Photo / Supplied
But it wasn't an easy journey. The pair spent the first five years of the business battling their addiction. Photo / Supplied

But before the success of her business, Cordeman's relationship with alcohol and drugs was at its peak, abusing everything from marijuana to ecstasy. She was in too deep to make a change.

"Having no meaning in life can lead to addictions and destructive patterns," The Melbourne-based business owner told news.com.au

The 44-year-old was hiding her sexuality from her family which formed a big part of her addictive lifestyle.

"It was probably during the first five years of the business I was like this," Cordeman said.

"Both of us (Nyree) happen to be gay and we didn't know it. We were both in long-term relationships and when they ended Nyree and I started to indulge in drugs.

Tui grew up in a disconnected household filled with alcohol abuse. Nyree also experienced a challenging childhood. Photo / Supplied
Tui grew up in a disconnected household filled with alcohol abuse. Nyree also experienced a challenging childhood. Photo / Supplied

"I had issues with alcohol from when I was a teen — I came from a very different family background which had a history of alcohol abuse."

Cordeman said she didn't accept being gay and believed she was just going through a phase.

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"The drugs kept getting worse and worse — I had suicidal thoughts and it didn't matter what I did, nothing worked," she said.

"I always knew I was destined for better things but I couldn't get myself our of this drug-fulled situation."

Meanwhile, the friends still managed to keep the business afloat despite their partying and addictive lifestyles.

In 2009 Tui began her uphill journey of recovery, finding herself at a meditation retreat. Photo / Supplied
In 2009 Tui began her uphill journey of recovery, finding herself at a meditation retreat. Photo / Supplied

After her detox Cordeman became a dedicated Buddhist for two years, then built the courage to tell her mother she was gay.

"I knew she had negative views of homosexuality so it was difficult for me to tell her. It was silent on the phone and then she said 'it doesn't matter what you do or who you are, you are my daughter and I love you'."

Cordeman's business partner Hibbend also experienced a challenging childhood through to adult life but both women rallied against the challenges and suffering they faced to forge a better future for themselves.

"We both gave up alcohol together, and came out together. It tested our friendship, but we managed to save ourselves in the end. Now we are indestructible business partners because of the adversity we have overcome," Cordeman said.

Inside the Koh Living giftware shop. Photo / Supplied
Inside the Koh Living giftware shop. Photo / Supplied

Both women traded addiction for engaging artists, designing products and went on to establish Koh Living as a creative homewares brand.

"We built this business up from nothing with determination, passion and a lot of hard work. If we can do it while battling addiction, anyone can," Cordeman said.

Cordeman said since getting their "shit together" the business has grown substantially in the last three years.

"In an industry where shops are closing and people are struggling, wee grew 20 per cent which is unheard of in the retail industry. It is quite a lot considering we are self-funded and never had any help from anyone."

The duo made their first million in 2013.

The pair created Koh Living to bring connection and meaning to others through inspiring giftware. Photo / Supplied
The pair created Koh Living to bring connection and meaning to others through inspiring giftware. Photo / Supplied

"To be honest it's only been the last 12 months I started to feel proud of myself as there has been a lot beating up on the way. Like if I hadn't had such an addictive lifestyle things could have been different."

But it was a learning process for the pair — "The first five years we were addicted to alcohol and drugs, next five years we spent trying to recover and the last five years we really got it together and we now know exactly who are, what we want our business to be and our purpose," Cordeman said.

"Anybody can do this if given the right tools to grow but you have to want to — I really wanted to. I was sick of it."