Jamie Morton is the NZ Herald's science reporter.

Kiwi's key to ancient seas

The fossil whale Balaenoptera bertae belongs in the same genus as minke and blue whales and would have been 5m to 6m long. Photo / Robert Boessenecker
The fossil whale Balaenoptera bertae belongs in the same genus as minke and blue whales and would have been 5m to 6m long. Photo / Robert Boessenecker

Research by an Otago University geology student has uncovered a strange pre-Ice Age world where primitive porpoises and baleen whales roamed the North Pacific alongside comparatively modern marine mammals.

Studying hundreds of fossil bones and teeth he excavated from the San Francisco Bay Area's Purisima Formation, Robert Boessenecker has put together a record of 21 marine mammal species including dwarf baleen whales, odd double-tusked walruses, porpoises with severe underbites and a dolphin closely related to the now-extinct Chinese river dolphin.

Among his findings documented in the international journal Geodiversitas is a new species of fossil whale, Balaenoptera bertae, a close relative of minke, fin and blue whales.

The findings represent eight years of research on bones fossilised 5 million to 2.5 million years ago.

- NZ Herald

Get the news delivered straight to your inbox

Receive the day’s news, sport and entertainment in our daily email newsletter

SIGN UP NOW

© Copyright 2016, NZME. Publishing Limited

Assembled by: (static) on production apcf03 at 01 Jul 2016 03:45:57 Processing Time: 724ms