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The photos of her great grandchildren's arrival in Canada on Saturday surely made the Queen beam with pride.

However, Her Majesty might not have been as impressed with her granddaughter in-law the Duchess of Cambridge who performed what is deemed a royal parenting faux pas on day one of their Canadian tour.

As the family touched down at Victoria airport the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge lead their two children Princess Charlotte and Prince George off the plane.

At one point Kate, while holding Charlotte, squats down to Prince George's height in order to speak to her son - the same manouver that caused Prince William to receive a telling off from the Queen.

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What is active listening?

The parenting technique known as active listening may not be favoured by the Queen but experts praise the use of it. Photo / Getty
The parenting technique known as active listening may not be favoured by the Queen but experts praise the use of it. Photo / Getty

The parenting technique known as active listening may not be favoured by the Queen but experts praise the use of it.

Child development expert Gill Connell told People magazine: "Active listening is one of the most important ways you can send the message, 'You're important to me.' Get down on the child's level, lean in and make eye contact."

"These simple messages foster self-esteem in powerful ways while encouraging him to communicate even more."

The Queen does not approve

The Duke of Cambridge was scolded by his grandmother during the trooping of the colour in June when he too squatted down to speak to his son.

The monarch was seen tapping her grandson on the arm and gesturing him to stand up as he crouched down on the balcony of Buckingham Palace during the RAF display.

Luckily the Queen wasn't on hand to do the same to Kate when she bent down to talk to George at the military base in Victoria on day one of their eight day tour.

Prince William has been seen using the technique on several occasions and we are likely to see more of it over the coming week.

While the two children have not been seen in public since their arrival they are expected to join their parents later in the week.

Sources in Canada have told The Mail on Sunday that a "family-friendly" programme is currently being co-ordinated between Kensington Palace and the Department of Canadian Heritage.

A source said: "We are told the children are coming and the itinerary is being co-ordinated accordingly. There will be a heavy focus on nature, the outdoors and at least one private day factored into the trip.

"We're hearing hiking, walking and outdoor pursuits will feature while the family is in British Columbia." It is also understood that Prince William would like to take George fishing.

William and Kate will squeeze 32 engagements into their eight-day visit, but there will also be occasions for Charlotte and her three-year-old brother Prince George to enjoy.

They will meet the Trudeaus' three children, Xavier, eight, Ella-Grace, seven, and two-year-old Hadrien and are expected to attend a children's party in Victoria.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge last visited the North American country in 2011, just months after they tied the knot at Westminster Abbey.

The Cambridges left Prince George and Princess Charlotte at home earlier this year when they carried out a whirlwind tour of India and Bhutan, but said they had missed their children.

Canada will be welcoming the Duke and Duchess as the country prepares to celebrate its 150th anniversary of independence.