Charlotte Dawson quits Twitter over abuse

Charlotte Dawson during her interview with 60 Minutes about online bullying. Photo / YouTube
Charlotte Dawson during her interview with 60 Minutes about online bullying. Photo / YouTube

Kiwi celebrity Charlotte Dawson has deleted her Twitter account, the day after receiving a barrage of Twitter complaints over her involvement in a new Australian reality show.

Dawson, who was hospitalised a month ago after receiving a barrage of online criticism, had defended her involvement in Fox Footy's Fashion Police TV show.

The TV personality, along with social commentator Melissa Hoyer and fashion designers Peter Morrissey and Alex Perry, were enlisted by the pay TV channel to comment on the clothes worn by WAGs at the AFL Brownlow Medal ceremony on Monday night.

The show immediately copped a barrage of criticism via Twitter for being too harsh.

Dawson, who complained of cyber bullying in August, was the main recipient of the complaints.

"Charlotte Dawson aka @mscharlotteD from bully victim to hosting show that degrades women based on their fashion choices" one tweet said.

Another tweet said: "Charlotte Dawson sure can dish it out, but taking it is a whole different matter. #fashionpolice #brownlowmedal"

And another: "Charlotte Dawson can criticize (sic) but cant take it absolute disgrace @mmmhotbreakfast.''

"Charlotte Dawson did herself no favours tonight. You give it, you cop it. That was the most disgraceful viewing I've ever seen.'' another tweet read.

Dawson responded to to the criticism, tweeting: "Never said one negative thing, maybe you were watching another show."

"It was very positive, nobody was harassed, threatened or invited to die," she wrote.

However TV personality and former model has now deleted her Twitter account.

At the end of August Dawson was admitted to hospital following an attempt on her life, after being the subject of continuous attacks by cyber-bullies.

At the time, she told 60 Minutes she kept reading comments from online bullies because she had a "terrible Twitter addiction".

"It just kept going, and going, and going, and going, and going," she said.

The issue saw a list of high-profile Australians come forward with stories about their own Twitter abuse and led to a campaign driven by News Ltd's Daily Telegraph against so-called "Twitter trolls".

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- AAP

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