I COMPLETELY support Stan Hood's letter to the editor of January 24 on a new build in the city.

Years ago Elinor McDouall showed me the space they were thinking of putting a dwelling on for retirement when the larger house was beyond their usefulness. They love this place and are deeply connected with it.

Stamping on new ideas is so Whanganui, sadly. We are privileged to have large sections of land compared to many other places /countries. Why can't we be more prepared to be inclusive, to share, to be tolerant of each other?

The world is on a difficult path and likely to become more so with climate variations. Sharing, tolerance, inclusiveness, kindness — all emotional intelligence traits required for the future. Teach your children well.

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Wishing you a beautiful house on the hill for those later years.

CUSHELA C ROBSON
Whanganui


Inspiring campaigner

What an inspiring article in the Wanganui Chronicle: "Campaigner rewarded for tireless work," about 70-year-old Sandra Kyle's efforts to help all animals in need.

Her weekly animal rights radio show, presentations, school and animal shelter visits,

media interviews, and slaughterhouse vigils have been rewarded by a citation from the Philip Wollen Animal Welfare Award and $5000 to further her work, to be presented to her on March 22 in Haryana, India.

What a wonderful acknowledgement for a woman who has devoted her life to helping our fellow earthlings.

Philanthropist Phillip Wollen's generosity extends to poor children and abused animals everywhere.

DIANE CORNELIUS
Seacliff Park, South Australia


We can't deny God

Three things I read: First, your dismal editorial on January 10 about going back to work. Then Terry Sarten's wisdom about recovery of the moral compass. This morning it's the last chapter of Ecclesiastes — the proverbial wisdom of Solomon. "Remember your Creator in the days of your youth ... fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man".

They are all the same. We can't deny, or truly live without God. The world bends over backwards to prove utter nonsense that there is no God — that it all began by a remarkable accident. Even that leaves the question how and why it happened.

We are not expected, and nor can we hope to understand. We can only believe and leave it to God. Stop worrying. Life's not hopeless. If you want answers, ask someone who knows: God.

JOHN TRIPE
Matarawa


Vaping harm unknown

Louise Sligo doesn't say whether she is now free of smoking and vaping, or substituted one for the other.

The problem with just switching is that little research has been done on the potential harm to the lungs and body of the chemical compounds in the vaped liquid.

Second-hand vaping could also impact other people. It may be that 10 years from now thousands of vapers suffer from cancers and illnesses caused by their habit.

Vaping is also frequently connected with cannabis and other drugs, the delivery system making the chemicals consumed relatively anonymous. Our lungs are designed to efficiently deliver oxygen to our bloodstream. Misuse of them is likely to result in harm, not only to lungs but to every organ.

MANDY DONNE-LEE
Aramoho


Saving the planet

Rosemary Penwarden has passed on air travel. She wants to save the planet, but not Al Gore, the man with many well-lit homes. Private jets and limos are his mode of transport, he and his fellow apostles travel all around the world in their thousands to try and convince the world that what they say is a fact, is a fact.

These apostles make decisions as to how the flock should live, ride bikes, use buses, turn off lights when going to another room.

Rosemary now travels by bus and train. As fossil fuel is eliminated she will have to change to horse and cart. At least with the Greens abolishing grassland farming to save the planet there'll be plenty of fuel for her horse.

G R SCOWN
Whanganui


Send your letters to: The Editor, Whanganui Chronicle, 100 Guyton St, PO Box 433, Whanganui 4500; or email editor@wanganuichronicle.co.nz