There's no place on New Zealand farms for military style assault weapons, says Federated Farmers.

But Feds Firearm Safety spokesman Miles Anderson told The Country's Jamie Mackay rural people still relied on semi-automatic weapons for pest control.

"In some cases they don't and in some cases they do. If you're dealing with huge numbers of pests, whether it's rabbits, hares, wallabies, deer, goats, tahr – unfortunately the best tool for the job is a semi-automatic firearm."

Read more: Ardern says changes to gun laws are coming

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Mackay suggested perhaps a "one gun, one bullet," option would be better for controlling pests.

"The problem is Jamie, by the time you reload in the case of the lot of those animals, they're gone – and you haven't dealt with the pest problem at all."

Miles Anderson said rural people still relied on semi-automatic weapons for pest control. Photo / File
Miles Anderson said rural people still relied on semi-automatic weapons for pest control. Photo / File

Anderson said Federated Farmers backed the Government's stance on making gun licensing laws tougher, in the wake of the Christchurch mosque shootings.

"We support working with the Government around coming up with some solutions to what has been an obviously glaring hole in the rules and regulations around gun control."

Read more: Christchurch mosque shootings: Why farmer gave up his semi automatic

However, Anderson was quick to point out that he is not endorsing "military-type assault weapon[s]", as "there's no place for them on farm at all."

"I'm certain that something sensible can be worked out , we certainly don't want to have a repeat of what happened in Christchurch."

Listen to the full interview below: