Jigging, trolling spinning, lures and flies. The trout fishing jargon is extensive but if you spend too much time trying to decipher it you'll miss the boat on what trout fishing is all about.

And that's enjoying the outdoors, quality time with family or friends, camaraderie, and the scenery.

Former Rotorua woman Kathy Field now lives in Levin but returns to the city every year for the opening of the trout fishing season.

She was parked on the shores of Lake Tarawera this morning while her partner was out fishing on the water.

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Former Rotorua woman Kathy Field returns to the city for the trout fishing season each year with her partner. Photo / Stephen Parker
Former Rotorua woman Kathy Field returns to the city for the trout fishing season each year with her partner. Photo / Stephen Parker

"He was out as soon as it got light, probably about 6am. He would have been one of the first on the water.

"He really likes being out on the boat. The atmosphere and scenery on the lake and the camaraderie."

The couple took about two days to make the journey in their house bus.

Field said she wasn't usually too keen on fishing but had a licence this year so would try.

Dane trimmer back from a successful morning on Lake Tarawera. Photo / Supplied
Dane trimmer back from a successful morning on Lake Tarawera. Photo / Supplied

'It's fun to catch and nice to eat. It's nice down here in the evening."

Gus Cantlon travelled from Paengaroa and slept on his boat overnight. He was fishing by 6.15am and caught three trout before 9am.

"It's nice being on the water and being with your friends. If you catch something it's good, if you don't it's not a worry."

Bay of Plenty Regional Council had a presence at lakes Rotoiti, Ōkataina and Tarawera.

Young and old were out fishing for trout. Photo / Supplied
Young and old were out fishing for trout. Photo / Supplied

Biosecurity manager Greg Corbett was at Tarawera waiting to speak to those getting out of the water about the risks of pest plants and fish.

"We want to talk to them about lake weed, and make sure they've got awareness of catfish and what they can do to prevent the spread. We want people to have good practice."

Corbett said catfish had only been found at Lake Rotoiti but the council didn't want them moving.

Lake Tarawera local Libby Flectcher. Photo / Supplied
Lake Tarawera local Libby Flectcher. Photo / Supplied

"The main thing is the boats really need to have a good look over their gear and boat trailers and make sure there's no weeds attached."

Fish & Game council chairman Lindsay Lyons was also fishing on Monday morning, hoping to snag the $10,000 fish released by the organisation as part of the Fish for Gold campaign.

"There's a $10,000 fish out there somewhere. I don't have a clue which lake it's in."

Lyons had been fishing since about 6am and estimated there were more than 200 boats on the water with anglers from around the country.

"It's good being out on the water. It's lovely and calm. We see some jigging but there are not many fish being caught.

"There are people from Napier, Hastings, the Hauraki Plains ... with the tag a fish competition running that creates a lot of interest."

He said the change of light was the best time of day for trout fishing and that's when they had caught some, but since then it had gone quiet.

"Sitting out here the water's nice and blue and it's drifting along quietly. It's beautiful," he said.

"We're so lucky having all these lakes to enjoy."