At first glance, Coombe Ave looks not much different to many other suburban Auckland streets.

Kids tootle along the footpath on scooters, people are mowing lawns, music filters out open windows.

But Coombe Ave is different.

It is the residential Auckland street from which the most complaints to noise control have been made in 2016 - more than three a week on average, according to figures obtained from Auckland Council.

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One-hundred-and-eighty complaints had been made about the Otara street by November.

Coombe Avenue in Otara has had the most noise complaints in 2016. Photo/Greg Bowker
Coombe Avenue in Otara has had the most noise complaints in 2016. Photo/Greg Bowker

Only the city's main drag, retail-laden Queen St, received more, with 274 over the same period.

Council officials were eager to stress the number of complaints did not necessarily mean Coombe Ave was the street with the most genuine noise issues.

A request for more information about the complaints, made under the Official Information Act, was refused because it would take staff too long to extract.

So the Herald went to Coombe Ave to ask residents why so many complaints were made about noise in their street.

Most were perplexed by the street's claim to fame - but also not entirely surprised.

"We hear a lot of Wu-Tang, Scribe, and Fetty Wap," Courtney Wade says. Photo / Greg Bowker.

Twenty-two-year-old Courtney Wade only moved in a few weeks ago and had heard her share of noise, whether it was from motorcycles, planes coming and going along the nearby flight path or the music that pumped out of homes along the street.

"We hear a lot of Wu-Tang, Scribe, and Fetty Wap. He's annoying. He's the only one I can complain about."

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But she hadn't complained. As a fellow music fan, she can't.

"I'm not gonna lie. We are pretty guilty of blasting it out."

Coombe Ave in Otara. Photo / Greg Bowker.
Coombe Ave in Otara. Photo / Greg Bowker.

Half a dozen houses away, Teina Taunga said he had also never complained to noise control. The only noise that bothered him was the sound of cars going up and down the cul-de-sac.

There was music, but it was welcome as far as the 29-year-old was concerned.

"We hear a bit of Cook Island, a bit of rap, a bit of Samoan music, some old singers ... and we play reggae."

He enjoyed it, but rejected the Weekend Herald's suggestion of a Coombe Ave music festival.

"Nah, we don't want everybody coming here."

Moses Lola finds Coombe Ave
Moses Lola finds Coombe Ave "peaceful". Photo / Greg Bowker.

Three doors down at no.22, caregiver Moses Lola, 19, reckons the only noise in the street is from kids on the nearby playground.

"We just let the kids do what they do, because they are having fun. I find it kind of peaceful here."

Along the footpath, Felicia Cavanagh, 27, was walking her niece and two daughters to the shops. She's a lifelong Coombe Ave resident and can't understand the fuss.

"It's all good here."

Valentina Turner can.

She complained to noise control multiple times last year - she does not know how many times, but nowhere near 180.

"I love music, but it's just bass - boom, boom, boom. It's happened for nearly two years ... and in the middle of the night."

Many complaints later, the 61-year-old's neighbours appeared to have got the message.

She hoped it would stick.

"I think now I can sleep and I can live. I can make plans again."

Coombe Ave resident Valentina Turner has complained to noise control multiple times. Photo / Greg Bowker.
Coombe Ave resident Valentina Turner has complained to noise control multiple times. Photo / Greg Bowker.

Other streets with a high number of noise complaints last year were Wordsworth and Browns roads in Manurewa, with 145 and 144 each, and Avondale's Blockhouse Bay Rd, where 132 complaints were made.

Queen St also had the highest number of complaints in 2015, with 259, with Mt Wellington's Jarman Rd runner-up on 138.

According to Auckland Council's website, complaints about noise can be made at any time by calling 301 0101.

Complaints will be investigated in person and an excessive noise direction may be issued.

If noise is again found to be excessive with 72 hours, noise-offending equipment may be seized.