Health projects not able to be funded by the Government and treatments not available anywhere else in the country could get lift-off with today's official launch of the Auckland Health Foundation.

The initiative has been in the pipeline for nearly two years and will rely solely on public donations to advance new technologies, research and resourcing within Auckland District Health Board.

AHF chief executive Gwen Green said the initiative would run similarly to the Starship Foundation but focus more on adult health care.

"We have been working with each department at Auckland DHB and know they have a list of priorities and obviously with a budget not all were able to get funding."

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She said the purpose of the foundation was not to substitute public health care but to go above and beyond.

"A lot of our work will be looking at what's already being developed around the hospital and how we can pull it together and advance that."

One project that was already under way was world-class simulation centre which would operate as a learning environment for junior staff and a space to practice complex or uncommon procedures.

"The potential for improvement is significant. While some clinical areas have developed a stimulation curriculum greater consistency and better resourcing is required and we hope that's what will help achieve," Green said.

The foundation aimed to raise up to $5.5 million to fund the simulation centre project over the next three years.

Other projects that had already taken off were 40 in-hospital Whānau rooms for patients' loved ones, and a research and discovery fund planned to build New Zealand's largest medical training facility.

People making a donation would have the option to put their money towards the initiative of their choice.

Green explained there were two folds to the projects the foundation would look at funding and that was large scale that would benefit as many people as possible, and innovative ideas that would advance current systems.

AHF was the fifth DHB in the country to launch a foundation and Green said it was long overdue as Auckland DHB offered services to the whole country.

"People who can't get treatment within their region go to Auckland so everyone in New Zealand will benefit from this."

The Starship Foundation had been running for 26 years, along with the Hutt Hospital Foundation Trust in Wellington, the Well Foundation on the North Shore and the Middlemore Foundation in South Auckland.

What is the Auckland Health Foundation?

The Auckland Health Foundation financially supports projects, research and education for adult health services within Auckland DHB. The foundation goes beyond what is presently funded in the healthcare system to focus on promising ideas, innovations and technologies that have the potential to benefit patients and communities, but could otherwise not be developed without external investment.

Where will the foundation get its funds?

The Auckland Health foundation relies on donations from the public and grateful patients, and 100 per cent of funds raised go directly towards the projects for which they are intended. The foundation will use range of fundraising streams, for example a Grateful Patients Programme, corporate partnerships, tribute funds, bequests, one-off campaigns, third-party fundraisers and payroll giving – to name a few.

Who will benefit?

The foundation benefits everyone treated by Auckland DHB. Its supporters help more than 347,000 patients from across New Zealand every year.

What projects will the foundation fund?

The Auckland Health Foundation is launching with three priority projects to fund: the Auckland Simulation Centre of Excellence, a Research and Discovery Fund, and our Whānau Rooms rejuvenation Project. Supporters can also donate to their chosen department within adult health services, and those funds will support specific projects beyond what is currently funded, which have the capacity to transform healthcare and the way it is delivered.

For more information and to donate, visit www.aucklandhealthfoundation.org.nz.