We know you need quality, credible information now more than ever - and in this time of crisis, the team at the New Zealand Herald is committed to delivering that to you.

It's what we've been doing for more than 150 years - bringing you the journalism and stories that matter and holding the powerful to account.

And now, more than ever, we need your help to deliver the news you can trust - sign up to NZ Herald Premium for the very best New Zealand journalism and you'll have access to expanded business, political and investigative journalism, insightful analysis and commentary from our journalists.

Plus, a selection of unique and exclusive content from our global publishing partners including the New York Times, Financial Times and Times of London.

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For new subscribers, it's easy - and cheap - to subscribe. Simply go here.

Welcome to all of our new subscribers: your support is deeply appreciated.

If you're yet to join us, we wanted to show you what you're missing - here's a selection of the best stories from our team.

Rob Fyfe: Preparing us and business for a life after Covid-19 and lockdown

Rob Fyfe has dealt with crises in his own business career. Photo / Doug Sherring
Rob Fyfe has dealt with crises in his own business career. Photo / Doug Sherring

Rob Fyfe wants business to prepare for living in a "Covid-19 world" for the foreseeable future.

Read the full story here

Matthew Hooton: Simon Bridges' leadership beyond salvaging

National Party leader Simon Bridges. Photo / File
National Party leader Simon Bridges. Photo / File

National must find a replacement who the public might at least listen to, writes Matthew Hooton.

Read the full story here

Former PM's 'real economy' warning

Sir Bill English, pictured during his valedictory speech in 2018, delivered a candid warning in March about the structural changes New Zealand would face from Covid-19. Photo / Mark Mitchell.
Sir Bill English, pictured during his valedictory speech in 2018, delivered a candid warning in March about the structural changes New Zealand would face from Covid-19. Photo / Mark Mitchell.

Sir Bill English gives candid warning of the broad and lasting impacts of Covid-19.

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Read the full story here

Covering Climate Now: Why does it take a pandemic to make us act?

Images of mass graves being dug around the world for Covid-19 victims are disturbing - but then so were those of Australia's catastrophic wildfires. Photo / Nathan Edwards
Images of mass graves being dug around the world for Covid-19 victims are disturbing - but then so were those of Australia's catastrophic wildfires. Photo / Nathan Edwards

Why hasn't the world responded to the global warming crisis with the same urgency as the Covid-19 pandemic?

Read the full story here

Inside NZ's favourite reality TV show – 1pm press conference

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern during the post-Cabinet media conference at Parliament. Photo / Mark Mitchell
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern during the post-Cabinet media conference at Parliament. Photo / Mark Mitchell

Everyone is familiar with the daily 1pm press conference but what's it like to be there?

Read the full story here

Boardroom power rankings: Who's delivering, and who needs to do better

To gauge directors' performances, the Herald analysed company shares listed on the NZX, pared with their directors' tenure as recorded on the Companies Register. Photo / Getty Images
To gauge directors' performances, the Herald analysed company shares listed on the NZX, pared with their directors' tenure as recorded on the Companies Register. Photo / Getty Images

Who bosses the bosses? Directors, that's who. But who watches them? Investigations reporter Matt Nippert and data journalist Keith Ng dive into a decade of share price performance data to power-rank the men and women behind the corporate thrones.

Read the full story here

Friends packed an Auckland bar to farewell a dead mate. None knew his dark past

Murray Mason. Photo / Supplied
Murray Mason. Photo / Supplied

A man was found dead in a creek in the Domain last winter. Steve Braunias traces the mysterious life of journalist Murray Mason.

Read the full story here

No funny business. Bret McKenzie gets serious

Brett McKenzie. Photo / Supplied
Brett McKenzie. Photo / Supplied

Bret McKenzie tells Greg Bruce some hard truths about the world of musical comedy and beyond.

Read the full story here

Plus, a selection of pieces from our global publishing partners.

Emmanuel Macron: It's time to think the unthinkable

French President Emmanuel Macron believes the coronavirus pandemic will transform capitalism. Photo / AP
French President Emmanuel Macron believes the coronavirus pandemic will transform capitalism. Photo / AP

France's president believes the coronavirus pandemic will transform capitalism — but leaders need to act with humility.

Read the full story from the Financial Times here

He could have seen what was coming: Behind Trump's failure on the virus

"Nobody knew there would be a pandemic of this proportion," Trump said. He has repeatedly said no one could have seen the effects of the coronavirus coming. Photo / Erin Schaff, The New York Times

An examination reveals the president was warned about the potential for a pandemic but that internal divisions, lack of planning and his faith in his own instincts led to a halting response.

Read the full story from The New York Times here

Bob Geldof on family tragedies and why he has no desire to be liked

Irish rock musician Bob Geldof. Photo / Getty Images
Irish rock musician Bob Geldof. Photo / Getty Images

He's the rock'n'roll singer who became a global hero, the outsider who mixed with world leaders, the husband and father whose life has been overshadowed by tragedy. The one thing Bob Geldof has always been is bloody difficult. And that's just the way he likes it.

Read the full story from The Times here

Deliverance from 8200 metres: The quest to bring bodies down from Everest

A sherpa works to bring the body of Goutam Ghosh down Mount Everest in May 2017. Photo / Dawa Finjhok Sherpa, Seven Summit Treks, The New York Times
A sherpa works to bring the body of Goutam Ghosh down Mount Everest in May 2017. Photo / Dawa Finjhok Sherpa, Seven Summit Treks, The New York Times

Hundreds have died trying to scale Everest, and its icy graveyard holds many bodies. New York Times reporter John Branch wrote about the desperate and dangerous pursuit to find two Indian climbers who died trying to reach the summit.

Read the full story here

The New Zealand Herald newsroom. Photo / Jason Oxenham
The New Zealand Herald newsroom. Photo / Jason Oxenham

And we answer the common questions we've had since launching Premium.

1. Do print subscribers have access to Premium?

Our five-, six- and seven-day NZ Herald and regional newspaper subscribers have automatic, free access to Premium. Those with weekend or part-week newspaper subscriptions receive a discount.

Print subscribers have received emails explaining how to activate their subscription.

2. How do I find Premium stories?

While much of our journalism, including breaking and "commodity" news, will remain free on nzherald.co.nz, you'll be able to easily recognise a Premium story - it's tagged with a gold "Premium" label.

As well as the Premium articles highlighted on our nzherald.co.nz homepage, here's some easy bookmarks to delve into the brilliant range of articles:

OUR PREMIUM LANDING PAGE, the gateway to all of our in depth content, across the board

PREMIUM WORLD, including the New York Times, the Times (UK), Financial Times, Daily Telegraph (UK) and Harvard Business Review

PREMIUM BUSINESS

PREMIUM POLITICS

PREMIUM SPORT

Premium articles will also feature heavily on the homepages of our business, politics, news, world, sport, lifestyle and entertainment sections and on each of our five regional newspaper websites - the Northern Advocate, Bay of Plenty Times, Rotorua Daily Post, Whanganui Chronicle, and Hawke's Bay Today.

Once you've signed up as a subscriber, you can also receive the best news and business Premium content in your inbox each day - simply by going into your settings on the website, and ticking the Premium newsletters box.

3. Why have we launched Premium?

It's no secret that the media industry, the world over, is facing headwinds. It's no different in New Zealand.

Digital subscriptions open a new revenue stream for us to help fund the future of quality journalism.

While the majority of the content on nzherald.co.nz will remain free - this is critical as we also support a mass-market model for our readers and advertisers - we believe it is important that we place a stake in the ground to help support the very best, unique and exclusive journalism.

It's not cheap to fund quality journalism - it takes time, resource and effort to expose the truth, make a difference and fight for the public. Your digital subscription will help fund our newsrooms well into the future, just as our loyal print subscribers have done for the past century (and in the case of the NZ Herald, for the past 156 years).

If you have signed up already, welcome again. And thank you.

To subscribe: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/my-account/subscription/offers/