The trial of a prominent New Zealander, his business manager, and a well-known entertainer will now be held in the High Court.

The trio's first trial, in the Auckland District Court, was aborted in March by Judge Russell Collins after nearly two weeks of evidence.

"There will need to be another trial at another day," the judge told the jury.

"[The decision] hasn't been taken lightly and has been taken very reluctantly."

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A suppression order, however, prevents the Herald from publishing the judge's reasons for the aborted trial.

Judge Russell Collins aborted the first trial in March. Photo / Jason Oxenham
Judge Russell Collins aborted the first trial in March. Photo / Jason Oxenham

A new six-week trial will now be held in June next year, Justice Simon Moore ordered today at the first High Court appearance of the three accused.

But further details from this morning's hearing were suppressed.

The prominent businessman faces two charges of indecent assault, which stem from allegations involving two incidents and two complainants in February 2008 and October 2016.

He is also charged with two counts of perverting the course of justice by attempting to dissuade the second complainant from giving evidence at his trial.

The entertainer, meanwhile, faces three charges of attempting to dissuade the same complainant, while the manager is charged with attempting to dissuade the witness on one occasion.

All three defendants are also accused of attempting to dissuade the witness on the Gold Coast during May 2017.

The entertainer alone is charged with attempting to dissuade the complainant in September 2017.

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All three of the accused still have name suppression, as they and the media await a High Court appeal of Judge Collins' decision to allow publication of their identities.

The prominent New Zealander's lawyer, David Jones, QC. Photo / Jason Oxenham
The prominent New Zealander's lawyer, David Jones, QC. Photo / Jason Oxenham

The appeal comes after a successful challenge of the interim suppression order by the Herald and Stuff.

A well-known political figure - whose name is suppressed - is expected to give evidence for the Crown.

Two other witnesses, who were granted immunity from prosecution by the Solicitor-General, also have name suppression pending a High Court appeal after Judge Collins declined to grant them the secrecy they desired.