The old adage of many hands making light work was proven once again last weekend when more than 70 volunteers took just two hours to plant 1100 trees and shrubs.

Sunday morning's planting bee, organised by Vision Kerikeri and the Friends of Wairoa Stream, brings the number of plantings along the stream to 2900 so far this season and 14,000 since the project began.

The aim is to turn what was once a weed-choked, inaccessible stream in central Kerikeri into a public walking track and wildlife corridor.

Vision Kerikeri founder Rod Brown said the group was now managing 3km of stream and about 2.5km of track.

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The walkway starts at a footbridge at bottom of Pā Rd, where it connects with a Department of Conservation track from the Stone Store, then heads upstream via Wairere Falls and the Cobham Rd Bridge as far as Shepherd Rd.

Brown said the group's next goal was to extend the track up a tributary of the Wairoa Stream around the back of Placemakers to a ''paper road'' Mill Lane extension, where it would connect with a public lane to Ranui Ave. That would form a loop complementing the existing loop via Shepherd Rd.

Sunday's plants were donated by Whangārei's Matariki Tu Rākau, a trust representing fallen and returned soldiers. A plaque will be installed to recognise their gift.

Eleven-year-old Dana Chandler, from Purerua Peninsula, was one of the organisers of the recent School Strike 4 Climate in Kerikeri. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Eleven-year-old Dana Chandler, from Purerua Peninsula, was one of the organisers of the recent School Strike 4 Climate in Kerikeri. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Andrea Sim, left, and Marilyn Kennedy, both of Kerikeri, plant a coprosma. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Andrea Sim, left, and Marilyn Kennedy, both of Kerikeri, plant a coprosma. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Jo Clapton of Kerikeri at work. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Jo Clapton of Kerikeri at work. Photo / Peter de Graaf
More than 70 people turned out to help turn a once weed-infested wasteland back into bush. Photo / Peter de Graaf
More than 70 people turned out to help turn a once weed-infested wasteland back into bush. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Fleur Corbett of Project Island Song plants a wharangi. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Fleur Corbett of Project Island Song plants a wharangi. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Eleven-year-old Aela Breeze from Kerikeri plants a kanuka seedling. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Eleven-year-old Aela Breeze from Kerikeri plants a kanuka seedling. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Volunteer Rob Moir takes a breather from planting near the Rotary-built Rod Brown Bridge. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Volunteer Rob Moir takes a breather from planting near the Rotary-built Rod Brown Bridge. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Rod Brown, whose efforts over many years made the Wairoa Stream track a reality, directs the volunteers. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Rod Brown, whose efforts over many years made the Wairoa Stream track a reality, directs the volunteers. Photo / Peter de Graaf