To have good quality beef animals, it is important to have all your ducks in a row, says Hereford stud breeder Gray Pannett.

Gray and Robyn Pannett will be hosting their 40th annual bull sale on their Teviot Valley property on May 28.

Last month they won the 2019 West Otago In-Calf Heifer large herd competition.

They run Limehills Hereford stud, which was started by Mr Pannett's father Tom.

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The 4000ha property near Millers Flat ranges from 100m flats to 900m hill country with about 2500ha of tussock for summer grazing.

Gray and Robyn Pannett's line of in-calf heifers won the recent 2019 West Otago In-Calf Heifer large herd competition. Photo / Supplied
Gray and Robyn Pannett's line of in-calf heifers won the recent 2019 West Otago In-Calf Heifer large herd competition. Photo / Supplied

The commercial sheep and beef property runs about 7000 sheep and 1200 cattle.

Half are commercial Hereford/Angus crosses.

Mr Pannett said they had been away while the judging of the in­calf heifers took place but the judges had been impressed with the line of 88 animals.

''It had been a good season until then, they were consistent to breed and in good order,'' he said.

''It is about the attention to details and genetics.

''You want a moderate size, efficient cow to 400 days and which can raise a good calf.''

He said it was also important to have the right balance of performance and phenotype.

''It is about having the right genetic package for the right environment and about getting all your ducks in a row.''

Although it had been dry, the cattle had a great season.

However, he said the ongoing dry autumn would have an impact on the following spring.

''There is a great saying in farming — you come out of winter how you went into it.''

That meant if there was little feed going into winter, there would be less in spring.

''It makes you more disciplined going through the winter.''

He said the stock spent much of their time in the hill country and did well in the tussock.

Mrs Pannett attended a three­day Agri-Women's Development Trust course for professional development in Christchurch last month.

''It was about identifying goals for what I wanted to do,'' she said.

She also learned how best to further develop her skills —including those learned as a former manager for Work and Income, as well as a practice manager for the local medical centre — for the benefit of the wider rural community.

Mrs Pannett has also recently become a celebrant and Justice of the Peace.

She has decided to become more involved in the rebranding of the stud.

While she has always done its administration, she intends to better utilise social media as well as improve its marketing and promotion.

''I quite enjoy that stuff and getting more involved.''