The Queen will be hoping a petition to prevent Donald Trump's state visit to the UK will persuade parliament, after a tweet from the new President emerged that embarrasses Kate Middleton.

Back in 2012 Mr Trump took to Twitter to discuss a story at the time where the Duchess of Cambridge was papped sunbathing topless.

The images were published in France, but not the UK. But that didn't stop the now President encouraging paparazzi photographers from making a bit of extra cash.


The issue of paparazzi images and the royals is particularly sensitive in the UK, after Princess Diana was killed in a car accident while being chased by photographers.

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At the time of Diana's death, Donald Trump also commented that he could have slept with her.

Shock jock Howard Stern asked him: "Why do people think it's egotistical of you to say you could've gotten with Lady Di? You couldn't gotten her, right? You could've nailed her."

At the time of Diana's death, Donald Trump also commented that he could have slept with her. Photo / Getty Images
At the time of Diana's death, Donald Trump also commented that he could have slept with her. Photo / Getty Images

"I think I could have", Trump replied.

Over one million people have signed the petition calling for the planned state visit by the new president to be cancelled.

Specifically mentioning 'embarrassing' the Queen, the petition is titled "Prevent Donald Trump from making a State Visit to the United Kingdom".

The invitation to make a state visit, which will involve lavish displays of royal pageantry and a banquet hosted by the monarch, was conveyed by Prime Minister Theresa May when she visited Trump in Washington last week.

Trump encouraged paparazzi to make money off the sunbathing Kate photos. Photo / Getty Images
Trump encouraged paparazzi to make money off the sunbathing Kate photos. Photo / Getty Images

But May came under pressure to cancel the visit after Trump issued an executive order barring Syrian refugees from the United States and suspending travel from seven Muslim-majority countries, sparking protests at home and abroad.

The petition is on the British parliament's website, and currently has over 1.3 million signatories - meaning it will be debated in parliament.

"Donald Trump should be allowed to enter the UK in his capacity as head of the US Government, but he should not be invited to make an official State Visit because it would cause embarrassment to Her Majesty the Queen," the petition says.

A growing list of politicians were also calling for the visit to be cancelled, including several politicians from May's own Conservative Party, opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

Trump encouraged paparazzi to make money off the sunbathing Kate photos. Photo / Getty Images
Trump encouraged paparazzi to make money off the sunbathing Kate photos. Photo / Getty Images

"We must now rescind the offer of a full state visit for President Trump - until this ban is lifted. I don't believe the people of London will support rolling out the red carpet until this happens," Khan wrote in the

Evening Standard

.

Labour politician Yvette Cooper was one of several legislators to accuse the government of a weak response.

Noting that Trump's order had been signed on Holocaust Memorial Day, she told Johnson: "For the sake of history, for heaven's sake have the guts to speak out."

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said the order barring U.S. entry to people from seven majority Muslim nations is "divisive, discriminatory and wrong."

But he rebuffed calls for the government to cancel Trump's planned state visit to the U.K. because of the temporary ban.

Johnson said he had told American officials that it's wrong "to promulgate policies that stigmatise people on the basis of their nationality." He told politicians in the House of Commons that the Trump administration had assured him that "all British passport holders remain welcome to travel to the U.S.," even if they are also citizens of one of the seven countries. Confusion has reigned about whether dual nationals are affected by the 90-day ban on citizens of Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Somalia, Syria, Yemen and Libya.

A spokeswoman for Prime Minister May told reporters Britain disagreed with Trump's executive order, but the prime minister's Downing Street office later made clear cancelling the visit was not on the cards.

"To be clear, the prime minister extended an invitation on behalf of the Queen - and she was very happy to do so. The USA is one of this country's closest allies, and we look forward to hosting the president later this year," Downing Street said.

The petition against the visit was the second most popular ever on the parliamentary website, after one calling for a second referendum on membership of the European Union drew over 4 million signatures last year. Once a petition passes 100,000 signatures, politicians must consider it for debate.