I don't often read the letters to the editor, but when I do, I'm disheartened by the moaning about fences from Peter Breen, CBD change from Harry Brasser and what appears to be an aversion to development from Paul Carpenter (all from Letters, April 22). He patai taku - What's the problem you guys? Why do fences and car parks and change make you so sad?

I don't see fences - I see renovations.

I don't see a lack of car parks in the CBD, I see more people on bikes and lovely yellow umbrellas.

I don't see a price tag on the lakefront- I see gifted lands ripe for improvement that truly encapsulates our unique cultural value proposition.

I personally love that our city leadership is progressive and not scared to try new innovative things. And I know I'm not the only one- just most of us are busy enjoying what Rotorua has to offer, rather than moaning.

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So here's a tip from a Rotorua millennial ratepayer. Stop focusing on the fences. Go for a wander downtown, download an e-book from the award winning Te Aka Mauri, take your mokopuna to our te reo Māori playground Taikākā and try some smashed avo on toast.

Kai tawhiti Rotorua. Rotorua is awesome.

Kerri Anne Hancock
Rotorua

Crusaders name change

I find it rather amusing that something that happened on the other side of the world 500 years ago can cause a New Zealand domestic rugby team to have to change its name.

This has all come about after that terrible event at two mosques in Christchurch where 50 people died.

Each to his own I'd say when it comes to religion. With so many gods, which one is the right one?

Religion is still is causing people to die. All in the name of what?

Apparently, there are some in our "we are one" communities that find the symbolism used by the Crusaders to be offensive. So be it.

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There are also some in our communities who find the attire of some to be less desirable, along with the treatment of their women-folk.

Now, this small minority expects to have a rugby team re-branded, can the rest of our "we are one" nation people, who are concerned about the attire and treatment of their women-folk expect to see a change in respect of headwear etc that does not enable gender identification.

Perhaps a trade-off might be in order, after all, they are in our "we are one" country and should not cause concern in our communities either.

I don't care one way or the other about who worships whose God as long as peace and harmony prevail in our "we are one" country.

Rod Peterson
Rotorua

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