Could the Hemo roundabout sculpture become a monument?

An area or a site of interest to the public for its great natural beauty, preserved and maintained by local government?

Or could it become a distraction? That which distracts, divides the attention or prevents concentration.

The logging truck accident last week highlighted how easily it could become an accident-prone site. The council should be "logging" the incident, as it may be timely to review the health and safety aspect, particularly having a walkway and cycleway below the sculpture on a busy highway.

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Is the roundabout design fit for purpose?

I don't think these serious concerns are barking up the wrong tree and thankfully nobody was seriously injured or killed on this occasion.

In order for people to "sleep like a log" in comfort, knowing this type of accident will be
prevented in the future, council together with NZTA need to undertake the task of investigating safety measures and reviewing its design.

A stitch in time saves nine? Meaning - deal with the problem when it first appears and you'll save a lot of time and money later. Or maybe nine lives?

Tracey McLeod
Lake Tarawera

They got it wrong
Now it has happened. Now perhaps the engineers who created this roundabout will admit they got it so very wrong.

I did make a comment a few weeks ago about the camber of this roundabout and wondered how long it would be before the first truck shed its load. I am relieved that there hasn't been a loss of life.

The time has come now to fill in that hole in the middle put in a proper under pass for the cyclists and pedestrians, forget the monolith that is obviously too difficult to build and apply some common sense. (Abridged)

Derek Packham
Lake Tarawera

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Landlords in it for the money
Richard Evans (Letters, September 4) is saying landlords are doing their tenants a favour when putting a roof over their heads.

I'm gobsmacked. So they aren't in it for the money? They aren't running a business?

If banks were paying 10 per cent interest that is where landlords would be putting their money instead.

Would it not be wonderful if landlords sold up en masse and first homebuyers were able to buy an affordable home? At the moment it is all demand and no supply.

Lesley Haddon
Rotorua