In response to "Countdown to ban plastic bags" (Daily Post, August 11). Protecting our environment seems like a great angle to deter from the fact that this is purely a way to save money in the long run.

Of course it would make sense to rationalise the decision by focusing on a positive environmental effect but let's not pretend these bags and the environment is a "new age" thing.

If genuine environmental awareness were the case, plastic bags would've been phased out a long time ago.
Gina Abrahams
Rotorua

In response to plant growth (Letters, August 11) plant labels in New Zealand are supposed to be a guide as to the eight to 10 year height a plant will grow.

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In many cases a plant will get a lot taller in 20, 50 or 100 years' time.

Plants do not stop growing, so a general guide of eight to 10 years is the easiest height to give.

Unfortunately, some labels are made overseas so can vary slightly.

Plant growth is also affected by many other factors like wind, water, fertiliser, soil type, pests and diseases, so plant growth can be turbocharged when given the right factors.

If you are unsure or want to check, just ask the experts - that's what we are here for.
Darryl Pierce
Palmers Rotorua owner

I always enjoy reading the little "in history today" column in the Daily Post, but it seemed like the Spartans got a raw deal last week when the battle of Thermopylae was remembered.

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The entry just said that the Greek Spartan King Leonidas was defeated by the "Persians": no mention that Persian King Xerxes had 600,000 frontline soldiers and probably as many support troops too, against the famous "300".

I guess after nearly 3000 years Leonidas can't complain, though: he's still in the news.
GJ Philip
Taupo

Perhaps Mr Sturt might like to take a gentle stroll through some of the streets in the suburb of Mangakakahi and discover for himself the parlous state of footpaths.

As resident in that area I would be delighted not to have to dodge subsidence, crumbling kerbs and other sundry obstacles as I walk for my regular exercise.
Rosemary MacKenzie
Rotorua