Rotorua councillor Fisher Wang has labelled the theft of stock from his family farm as "disgusting and disappointing".

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Last week, someone entered a paddock at Wang's family farm in Kaharoa and killed a sheep and a ram, leaving the wool and skin behind. He was unsure exactly which night the theft occurred.

"It's pretty disappointing and I've heard there have been a few reports of stock theft around the place.

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"We had our two rams together and we saw one of them had jumped into a paddock with our horses, which was strange. So, we went to have a look and found the skin and wool left behind from the other ram which was killed.

"It's sad because both the rams are really friendly and will come up to you and eat feed out of your hand. So they probably would've went up to whoever came and unfortunately were killed."

With rams used for breeding, the theft will have flow-on effects for farm business, meaning the plans in place for the season will need to be reworked.

Wang said a vehicle had been seen driving in the area and encouraged others to be on the lookout for anything out of the ordinary.

"We've moved all of our animals on to paddocks that aren't close to the road or directly beside the road. I put a post up (on Facebook) to warn others."

Rotorua councillor Fisher Wang has labelled the theft of stock from his family farm as disgusting. Photo / File
Rotorua councillor Fisher Wang has labelled the theft of stock from his family farm as disgusting. Photo / File

Federated Farmers Bay of Plenty provincial president Darryl Jensen said, sadly, stock theft was something that happened "from time to time" and the best thing victims could do was inform police as soon as possible.

"It happens occasionally and as part of our role at Federated Farmers, we keep in touch with local police and we report or these sorts of events. We have our own neighbourhood watch sort of thing, keeping an eye out for strange vehicles.

"We wish it didn't happen but there is the odd time animals are slaughtered in the paddock, the hide and the guts are left behind and the carcass and meat all taken away for someone's freezer.

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"Farmers need to be vigilant, any strange vehicles just record number plates and pass it on to police. The police say it's like a jigsaw puzzle and even something little can help them to piece things together."

A police spokesperson told the Rotorua Daily Post the stock theft had been reported and they were making inquiries.