Havelock North resident Debbie Berlin drew her Fairview Place neighbours together to donate furniture, clothes, home ware and kitchen ware to Re-source on Wednesday.

The registered charity collects and redistributes household items to social workers, community workers, women, schools and more.

Charity founder Nadine Gaunt said seven houses on the street arranged to donate together on Wednesday morning, for transport to the charity's base in a donated van.

"We've been managing with a tiny trailer, which is borrowed and has a hole in it, but I rang around rental companies and Cross Country Rentals have loaned us a van for the whole week for free," she said.

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"We filled it to the roof today – absolutely shoved the last thing in before heading to our site in Flaxmere. And we still had to make another trip."

Gaunt added: "It has revolutionised what we've been able to do. It was the perfect combination of community spirit."

Without the loaned van, Gaunt said it would have taken nine trips with the trailer to complete the job.

Re-source was not allowed to work under alert levels 3 and 4, causing a backlog of donations and those in need.

"During lockdown we weren't able to do pick-ups as we were not classified as an essential service," she said.

But Gaunt said some things just couldn't wait.

"The hardest thing has been keeping in touch with social workers. I've been frequently in tears over lockdown because I couldn't do anything to help," she said.

"There was one time I had to do something, as there was a baby with nothing and under no circumstances that could wait.

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"We put together an emergency parcel and delivered it the same day. The baby had no cot or clothes."

Anything that does not find a new home through Re-source is recycled, repaired or repurposed as much as possible.

Gaunt added that she, Kate McDonald, Michelle Fox and others had been working hard since the move to alert level 2.

"Someone of the things haven't even made it to the storing site in Flaxmere – we picked them up and dropped them off at houses in need right away," she said.