Palliative care experts in Hawke's Bay say they are against both David Seymour's members bill, and the legalisation of "any form" of euthanasia or assisted dying.

"Our reasons for this are many including that it creates a real risk of wrongful death by placing vulnerable people at risk of something not of their choosing," Cranford Hospice chief executive Janice Byford-Jones said.

"It is also against the core belief we hold that death and dying is a natural part of life.

Read more: Opinion polarised on End of Life Choice Bill

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"The subject of euthanasia is emotional and personal, and we acknowledge and respect the diversity of views. However, many of us who work in palliative care have real concerns about the private member's bill before Parliament, and moreover, with assisted suicide in general."

Byford-Jones added that there were also concerns about just how many people did not have a full understanding of what palliative or end of life care was actually all about and indeed, what was meant by "euthanasia".

"Euthanasia involves the intention to end a life.

"Euthanasia is not – when a person's pain relief is increased, the removal or discontinuation of unwanted treatment, the creation of do-not-resuscitate orders."

Those things were not euthanasia and were all part of "good end of life care", and choices already being made by people who were dying.

"Our aim is to help people make the most of their lives; to live every moment in whatever way is important to them.

"We don't talk enough about dying and we need to change that. We think it would help if people knew a bit more about the actual process of dying and what to expect
We suspect a lot of the current debate is fueled by fear of the unknown, and a lack of information about what care is available and what actually happens when someone dies.

"In our experience a good safe death is peaceful, dignified and a natural process.

"People advocating for a law change talk about choice, compassion, and dignity, as if euthanasia were the only way to achieve these things. But these are the founding tenets of Hospice services: you can have choice, compassion, and dignity at the end of your life, and you don't have to kill yourself for them, or have someone kill you to achieve this."

While conversations needed to be had around death and dying, some "myth-busting" was needed to ensure those conversations were based on reality and not fear.