Loud neighbours prompted almost 6000 noise complaints to Tauranga City Council last year - including 63 about loud music at one residential address.

Up to December 21, there had been 5943 complaints made to Tauranga City Council's noise control hotline. At least 510 notices for excessive noise were issued and equipment was seized 17 times.

The most complaints about an address were about amplified music, voices and instruments at Greerton Hall, of which 64 complaints were made, closely followed by the 63 loud music complaints at a residential address.

A resident who lives near Greerton Hall said there had been regular issues about one particular user, but the matter was resolved after the council asked the group to move on.

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The man, who asked not to be named, said he and his family also had issues with loud noise from another property further down the street, but that too had been resolved.

"My advice is to talk to the neighbour in the first instance and if can't get them on side you should complain to the council as people have rights under the Tenancy Act," he said.

Tauranga City Council's environmental protection manager Andrew McMath urges people to be considerate and keep their noise levels down. Photo / File
Tauranga City Council's environmental protection manager Andrew McMath urges people to be considerate and keep their noise levels down. Photo / File

Another man, who also lives in Greerton Village, said noise from this hall was not a big issue for him, but there were problems with noise from another venue from time to time.

"But officially complaining about is a waste of time as there needs to between three to five neighbours prepared to do so before something gets done about it," he said.

The resident said it was difficult because he did not want to fall out with his neighbours.

Tauranga City Council's environmental protection manager Andrew McMath said there was no significant difference in the number of complaints last year compared to this year.

"There had not been any incidents which warranted serving an infringement notice.

"People are entitled to make a reasonable amount of noise, but we would ask everyone to be considerate of their neighbours, especially at this time of year."

Western Bay District Council received 739 complaints in the 2017/2018 financial year and 206 from July 1 to October 31 this year, with 30 infringement notices issued.

Rachael Davie, the council's regulatory services group manager, said a number of the complaints were seasonal in nature such as frost fans and bird scarers on horticultural blocks.

Residential noise complaints there tended to be the usual range of triggers, such as loud music and loud equipment like lawnmowers and chainsaws, she said.

"We encourage people to ... consider your neighbours when doing things that generate noise.

"Our advice is to talk to your neighbours first to let them know what you're up to, so there are no noisy surprises."