A new concept design of an expansive playground inspired by the ideas of local children is part of the new details revealed for the almost $40 million Lakefront redevelopment.

An update on the project was provided at the council's Operations and Monitoring Committee meeting today and details and concept designs were given on a new playground planned and about the future of Memorial Drive.

The council previously held four workshops with children to ask what they wanted to see in a new playground and more than 100 children participated in the workshops led by landscape designers.

The council has also been working with the Returned and Services Association about what could happen to Memorial Drive.

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The plans revealed today show Memorial Drive will be replaced with a memorial plaza and car parking.

Conceptual impression of the Rotorua Lakefront development from last year. Image / File
Conceptual impression of the Rotorua Lakefront development from last year. Image / File

The council's strategic development manager​ Portia McKenzie told the committee the Returned and Services Association wanted to keep the existing gateway feature to the road.

"They felt it was more of a through road and there's not as much respect for the plaques that are there in the centre.

"We are looking at more of a memorial plaza than a memorial drive."

Barry Curtis Park in Auckland provides an idea of what the Memorial Plaza in Rotorua could look like once complete. Image / Supplied
Barry Curtis Park in Auckland provides an idea of what the Memorial Plaza in Rotorua could look like once complete. Image / Supplied

The existing memorial plaques will be moved to the waterfront and the work would include 91 new trees and an enlarged car parking area at the expense of the road.

"It gives a real place for reflection," McKenzie said.

"The RSA would like to see a lot more plaques added too, really reflecting all the places our armed forces have served."

McKenzie said the space would also be able to be used for events in the future, and for the start of the Anzac Day parade.

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McKenzie also provided an update on the playground portion of the Lakefront redevelopment, which $1m has been set aside for.

A concept image of the new playground at the Rotorua Lakefront. Image / Supplied
A concept image of the new playground at the Rotorua Lakefront. Image / Supplied

Some of the key themes the children said they wanted at the workshops were different types of swings, climbing structures, a flying fox and facilities for all ages.

Adults at the workshops also wanted to be catered for and have a space to sit and watch their children playing.

The new playground will be roughly three times the size of the existing Volcanic Playground and be surrounded by two concentric rings acting as loops for bikes, scooters and skateboards.

It will also feature dual flying foxes, a rope course, pendulum swing and more.

The playground designers also looked at what existing playground equipment could be kept or re-used.

Beside the playground will be a basketball half court and new toilets.

Children at the existing volcanic playground. Photo / File
Children at the existing volcanic playground. Photo / File

Group manager strategy Jean-Paul Gaston said accessibility would also be improved and the playground would include timber.

He said after some preliminary work the council would issue a tender document before working through the exact timing of the project with contractors.

He said work could start in August or September and construction was likely to take three to six months.

Parents at the Volcanic Playground today were positive about the concept design.

Adam Soar said he visited the playground often with his almost 4-year-old son and was excited about the riding tracks.

"He's definitely into riding. We often ride out to Sulphur Point."

Parent Brady Hoppen agreed the concept design looked cool and said he liked to see natural elements incorporated.

"Back home in Australia there are a lot of eco playgrounds built from raw timber materials, just trying to get the natural flow to it all.

"They incorporate a lot of carvings and sculptures as well, getting away from plastics and steel."

Hoppen said he liked the fact the concept design incorporated places for parents to sit and supervise children.