A record 50-plus student companies marketing everything from recycled clothing to a home-built underwater drone took part in Saturday's Young Enterprise Scheme Trade Fair at the Old Packhouse Market in Kerikeri.

The aim of the fair was to give the scheme's young entrepreneurs a chance to showcase their wares and hone their sales techniques. Prizes were awarded to the three best-performing and best-presented businesses, as well as to customer choice winners decided by public vote. Peter de Graaf went along too.

Winning team Taiao Kawakawa from Bream Bay College produces all-natural kawakawa soap and balm. From left, Kaycee McGrath (16, Ruakākā), Rain Tuapawa (17, Ruakākā), Leonardo Clement (16, Waipū) and Crystal Mitchell (16, Ruakākā). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Winning team Taiao Kawakawa from Bream Bay College produces all-natural kawakawa soap and balm. From left, Kaycee McGrath (16, Ruakākā), Rain Tuapawa (17, Ruakākā), Leonardo Clement (16, Waipū) and Crystal Mitchell (16, Ruakākā). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Ryona Winwood, 17, Paihia, and Holly Billington-Field, 17, Kerikeri, placed third with Strings 'n' Things, a business turning old guitar into shelves and ukeleles into birdboxes. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Ryona Winwood, 17, Paihia, and Holly Billington-Field, 17, Kerikeri, placed third with Strings 'n' Things, a business turning old guitar into shelves and ukeleles into birdboxes. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Ruakaka 17-year-olds, from left, Nina Matenga, Sarah Burling and Zena Finlayson of Boho Arts and Crafts, which makes painted rocks, pots and dream catchers. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Ruakaka 17-year-olds, from left, Nina Matenga, Sarah Burling and Zena Finlayson of Boho Arts and Crafts, which makes painted rocks, pots and dream catchers. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Te Kapehu Whetu students Raiha Poutu (16, Towai), Ngaroma Gardener (16, Whangarei) and Opal Wilson (16, Whangarei) were voted second in customer choice for their kawakawa balm business Takurua.
Te Kapehu Whetu students Raiha Poutu (16, Towai), Ngaroma Gardener (16, Whangarei) and Opal Wilson (16, Whangarei) were voted second in customer choice for their kawakawa balm business Takurua.
Mud Tech founders Irimana van der Mei (17, Kaitaia Abundant Life School), Taz Snelling (17, Kaitaia College) and Troy Panapa-Thurlby built an underwater drone to inspect boat hulls for marine pests.
Mud Tech founders Irimana van der Mei (17, Kaitaia Abundant Life School), Taz Snelling (17, Kaitaia College) and Troy Panapa-Thurlby built an underwater drone to inspect boat hulls for marine pests.
Second-placed Tee Bags from Tauraroa Area School turn unwanted T-Shirts into reusable shopping bags. From left, Nakisha Blackburn (16, Maungatapere), Calarnie Bettin (16, Waiotira), Alice Weatherall (17, Whangārei) and Sam Parry (17, Maungatapere). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Second-placed Tee Bags from Tauraroa Area School turn unwanted T-Shirts into reusable shopping bags. From left, Nakisha Blackburn (16, Maungatapere), Calarnie Bettin (16, Waiotira), Alice Weatherall (17, Whangārei) and Sam Parry (17, Maungatapere). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Organic cookbook author Rosie Robinson (16, Kerikeri) with sister Claire, 5. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Organic cookbook author Rosie Robinson (16, Kerikeri) with sister Claire, 5. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Addalicent Croft (17, Kaikohe), Aylah-Rose Narbey-Nimeti (17, Kaikohe), Ruhia Mason (16, Kaikohe) and Paula Te Namu (16, Tautoro) of Northland College business have made a board game called Te Rerenga/The Journey to teach New Zealand history and culture in a fun way. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Addalicent Croft (17, Kaikohe), Aylah-Rose Narbey-Nimeti (17, Kaikohe), Ruhia Mason (16, Kaikohe) and Paula Te Namu (16, Tautoro) of Northland College business have made a board game called Te Rerenga/The Journey to teach New Zealand history and culture in a fun way. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Te Kura Taumata o Panguru students Niheta Atama-Tamati (16, Panguru), Mazaine Tahana (17, Mitimiti) and Ngakahuwhero Ngaropo Te Tai (16, Panguru) have made an insecticide/fertiliser from the pest plant wild ginger. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Te Kura Taumata o Panguru students Niheta Atama-Tamati (16, Panguru), Mazaine Tahana (17, Mitimiti) and Ngakahuwhero Ngaropo Te Tai (16, Panguru) have made an insecticide/fertiliser from the pest plant wild ginger. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri 17-year-olds Emily Arthur, Makailya Knapping and Abi Caley make dog treats called Nuts for Treats. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri 17-year-olds Emily Arthur, Makailya Knapping and Abi Caley make dog treats called Nuts for Treats. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kaeo home-school students Abby Hay, 13, Nina Quinlan, 12, and Jessica Quinlan, 13, of Nature Ninjas, a company producing seeds, vegetable seedlings and fertiliser, all without plastic packaging.
Kaeo home-school students Abby Hay, 13, Nina Quinlan, 12, and Jessica Quinlan, 13, of Nature Ninjas, a company producing seeds, vegetable seedlings and fertiliser, all without plastic packaging.
Kerikeri 16-year-olds Gina Baguley and Thea Hodge produced a book called Fun for Free about low-cost activities around Northland. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri 16-year-olds Gina Baguley and Thea Hodge produced a book called Fun for Free about low-cost activities around Northland. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kamo High School's Kahn Tangihaere-Brom, 15, produced a toileting book for children with autism. Team-mate Mya Kereopa is absent. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kamo High School's Kahn Tangihaere-Brom, 15, produced a toileting book for children with autism. Team-mate Mya Kereopa is absent. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Santana Hobson, 19, of Hiwa-i-te-rangi in Kaikohe produces Peepi Pack gifts for new mums. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Santana Hobson, 19, of Hiwa-i-te-rangi in Kaikohe produces Peepi Pack gifts for new mums. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Bream Bay College business Manaia Park Honey produces mānuka honey infused with chili, rose and vanilla. From left, Lucy Bayer (16, Waipū), Tia Lambly (17, Ruakākā), Dallas Vousden (16, Waipū), Maddie Greatorex (16, Mangawhai) and Jack Paton (17, Ruakākā). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Bream Bay College business Manaia Park Honey produces mānuka honey infused with chili, rose and vanilla. From left, Lucy Bayer (16, Waipū), Tia Lambly (17, Ruakākā), Dallas Vousden (16, Waipū), Maddie Greatorex (16, Mangawhai) and Jack Paton (17, Ruakākā). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Whangarei Girls' High students Michelle van Blommestein, 17, and Natalie Xu, 18, make corsages and buttonholes under the business name Bundle of Floral. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Whangarei Girls' High students Michelle van Blommestein, 17, and Natalie Xu, 18, make corsages and buttonholes under the business name Bundle of Floral. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Alexandra McGregor (24, Moerewa) of Hiwa-i-te-rangi in Kaikohe produces low-cost, upcycled children's clothing under the label Eco Styles. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Alexandra McGregor (24, Moerewa) of Hiwa-i-te-rangi in Kaikohe produces low-cost, upcycled children's clothing under the label Eco Styles. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Tauraroa Area School business InDated sells label used clothing. From left, Oliver Karels (16, Maungatapere), Brooke Harvey (16, Maungatapere), Ezra Dwayne (16, Tangiteroria) and Kaprice Dobbs (17, Waiotira). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Tauraroa Area School business InDated sells label used clothing. From left, Oliver Karels (16, Maungatapere), Brooke Harvey (16, Maungatapere), Ezra Dwayne (16, Tangiteroria) and Kaprice Dobbs (17, Waiotira). Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri 16-year-old Olivia Bell produced a cookbook with recipes from well-known Northlanders called A Taste of Northland. Team-mate Leia Weeds is absent. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri 16-year-old Olivia Bell produced a cookbook with recipes from well-known Northlanders called A Taste of Northland. Team-mate Leia Weeds is absent. Photo / Peter de Graaf