Plans to return large sections of Te Mata Park to native bush in an attempt to create a more biodiverse park are set to begin, despite a slight delay.

Pan Pac Forest Products will initiate forestry work in the park on March 2, after a delay due to reasons beyond the control of the Te Mata Park Trust Board.

Almost 12 hectares of old pine plantations will be removed from Te Mata Peak during the three-year forestry and revegetation project and will be replaced by nearly 60,000 native plants.

The famous redwoods will not be affected by the plans.

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The forestry work followed by the clearing of debris and re-establishment of tracks, will affect public access to the park for six to eight weeks.

Almost 12 hectares of old pine plantations will be removed from Te Mata Peak and replaced by nearly 60,000 native plants. Photo / Supplied
Almost 12 hectares of old pine plantations will be removed from Te Mata Peak and replaced by nearly 60,000 native plants. Photo / Supplied

Te Mata Park Trust chairman Mike Devonshire acknowledged the inconvenience to park users, but said the outcomes of the work will be "magnificent".

"We will endeavour to re-open the tracks as soon as possible, once the logging operations are complete," he said.

"We realise this will be a great inconvenience to our park users, and sincerely apologise for this interruption to your daily or weekly excursions to the park.

"However we are confident that this short-term disruption will create magnificent long-term gains."

The project will look to improve biodiversity and create a habitat for native birdlife.

The Park Trust Board also said they welcome community inquiries and feedback, as well as seeking volunteers to act as security during the logging.