After two weeks of art, music and theatre, the Harcourts Hawke's Bay Arts Festival has wrapped up for another year.

Festival Director Pitsch Leiser said it been very successful this year.

"As a whole it went absolutely fantastic."

Between bought tickets, the schools programmes and free events, he said close to 30,000 people had actively engaged with the festival this year, the biggest it has ever been.

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"Overall we got incredibly positive feedback from everyone who came along."

For him, Limbo was one of the highlights, with around 3200 people attending.

"Limbo was certainly, a very big show which would never ordinarily be seen here.

Limbo was one of the highlight of the festival this year. Photo / Supplied
Limbo was one of the highlight of the festival this year. Photo / Supplied

"That's massive, for anything in Hawke's Bay, that is huge."

In terms of theatre he said An Iliad, starring Michael Hurst and Shayne Carter, was his favourite.

"It really showcased the artistry of Michael Hurst, and Shayne Carter on the music."

He said he also enjoyed Portraits in Motion, a photography showcase by German photographer Volker Gerling.

"That was a show that didn't have huge attendance, maybe 60-70 people, but just touched everyone's heart and soul."

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"Those would be the three top picks from my end."

He said the festival will definitely back for a sixth year in 2020, most likely with some changes which are yet to be decided.

"One thing that we do know is we will use the Hawke's Bay events Centre, Toitoi.

"It will be open next year, so we will bring in some big shows into the Opera House.

"For the rest, we are just reviewing, and looking forward to coming up with some exciting work."

Three-year-old Arthur Zaaiman, and Joe Nieddu enjoying White Night as part of the festival. Photo / File
Three-year-old Arthur Zaaiman, and Joe Nieddu enjoying White Night as part of the festival. Photo / File

He said he wanted to thank everyone who had attend the festival over its two-week run in 2019.

"A huge thank you to the audiences who made an effort to buy tickets, and come and take a risk, because not everything that we present is mainstream.

"You need to have an open mind to come out and choose something."

He said there was a massive team behind the scenes who work on the festival all year.

"And last but not least, if it wasn't for the artists who create beautiful work we wouldn't have a festival.

"The artists, in the end are the ones who bring us the joy, who bring us the challenges, who bring us the fun, the frivolity, whatever it is that we see."