The promise of a picture-perfect rocket launch across Hawke Bay at the end of this week is literally up in the clouds if it's unable to get underway at first shot.

Rocket Lab has a two-week 4.43pm to 6.32pm daily window available for a southern trajectory which agents say will be a good one for viewing along the East Coast.

National weather forecasters MetService agree, if a possible nor'westerly doesn't stop a Day 1 launch taking place.

A clear but mysterious view off the Hawke's Bay coast after a launch from Mahia last year. Photo / Supplied
A clear but mysterious view off the Hawke's Bay coast after a launch from Mahia last year. Photo / Supplied

If it does intervene it could be several days before both a launch and good viewing are possible, due to a southerly front expected from the South Island.

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The launch is the 12th for Rocket Lab from its Mahia Peninsula Electron launch pad, where it first launched commercially on January 21, 2018, after a range of test flights which had started eight months earlier.

It's billed as a timeshare mission for Nasa, the US National Reconnaissance Office and the University of New South Wales Canberra Space.

Its name – Don't Stop Me Now - and patch are dedicated to Rocket Lab board member Scott Smith who died in February, and carries the name of his favourite song, Queen's Don't Stop Me Now.

A second launch pad is being built within the Mahia complex to enable more launches.