Right Wing Resistance to march for Moko

By Nathan Crombie nathan.crombie@age.co.nz -
3 comments
Vaughan Tocker, Masterton-based Right Wing Resistance lieutenant-general and national director for Australia and New Zealand. PHOTO/FILE
Vaughan Tocker, Masterton-based Right Wing Resistance lieutenant-general and national director for Australia and New Zealand. PHOTO/FILE

Uniformed members of the Right Wing Resistance group will join a Justice for Moko March in Masterton to protest child abuse.

Vaughan Tocker, a Masterton scrap metal worker who holds the rank of lieutenant-general and heads the RWR in Australia and New Zealand, said there were today almost a dozen members of the group in Wairarapa, which includes divisions for women and youth.

He was confident the entire regional rank and file will turn out to protest child abuse at the Masterton march on June 27.

The march, which was organised by Masterton women Liz Rikiti and Amanda Dette, will be held on the same day as the sentencing in the Rotorua High Court of Tania Shailer and David William Haerewa, a couple who pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of Moko Rangitoheriri, a 3-year-old in their care tortured to death over a two-month period.

Mr Tocker said his group advocates family values that do not tolerate child abuse and spearhead policies like bans on the sale of state assets and the opening of New Zealand borders to Muslim immigrants.

He said RWR policies parallel the opinions of "what I call New Zealanders" too afraid to speak out, and there was a policy overlap for his group regarding child abuse and Islamic sharia law that "permits violence against women and marrying kids".

"I talk to all sorts of different people all over the country and just relay the feelings of people I talk to in public. A lot of people are too scared to get up and say what they feel or they're intimidated and feel that they can't because they'll get picked on by police or politicians, like I do.

"But our views aren't any different from what a lot of New Zealanders believe. I take a lot of flak for it but my shoulders are getting broader," he said.

"We'll be marching against child abuse and Islamisation. That's why I want to help out. I'm against child abuse and I look after my people -- all through my life -- my whole life has been helping other people. I speak from experience. Nobody has got more right to talk about these things than me.

"I've been through it, my family got put through it. I've seen what happens first hand. I tell you, sometimes I get scared too, but we have to stand up and eventually New Zealand will come to love us."

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