A travel blogger has gone inside North Korea to find out how its people tick.

After speaking with the locals Drew ''Binsky'' Goldberg made a surprise discovery; they are just like everyone else.

The 25-year-old spent three days inside Pyongyang last month and produced an eye-opening video of life inside the country's capital, news.com.au reported.

While stressing what he saw was a skewed perspective and highly controlled, he said his video wasn't about showing how good the country was.

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Rather he wanted to highlight how normal the people he met appeared. He posted the video to his Facebook and YouTube channels.

Speaking to news.com.au, Binsky admits he was nervous about his trip but knew he'd be fine so long as he didn't break any strict rules.

"This video is about my own personal experiences in North Korea, so please take what I say with a grain of salt," he said.

"I am well aware that all tours to the DPRK are organised and pre-planned, and what I saw was a skewed perspective."

However, that hasn't stopped many commenting that the video provided a glossy look at life inside Pyongyang with some even accusing him of acting as a tool of propaganda.

"I have gotten lots of negative feedback from people, saying you were forced by the North Korean government to say these things, etc, etc," he said.

"That is absolutely false. Everything I did, said, and made in this video is 100 per cent honest and from my own personal experience as I clearly stated in the beginning of the video.

"Nobody told me what to say or how to make this video. It was all me."

He also said being able to speak Korean, after spending 18 months in Seoul, meant he could interact with the locals.

"I had the ability to have conversations with locals and that was a really special experience for me," he said.

Binsky said he always had an interest in the Korean culture and, after taking a college class in North Korean propaganda in 2013, he wanted to see what the people were really like.

The US traveller spent three days inside Pyongyang and got up and close with the locals. Photo / Supplied
The US traveller spent three days inside Pyongyang and got up and close with the locals. Photo / Supplied

He also said his intention in making the video was to spread some positivity.

"Every type of content I produce is centred around one goal: spreading happiness and positivity in our world by connecting with people from around the globe," he said.

"North Korea is no different. I wanted my followers to see a different side of the DPRK, one that they certainly don't see on the news or on TV.

The US college graduate even ran in the Pyongyang Marathon during his visit. Photo / Drew Goldberg
The US college graduate even ran in the Pyongyang Marathon during his visit. Photo / Drew Goldberg

"Everything about this country in the media is negative, and after having positive and interesting experiences with the people I wanted to share it with the world. Also, I felt that it was my duty to get a behind the scenes look at the DPRK because I can speak Korean."

He said he was intimidated by all the police and soldiers in Pyongyang but knew he'd be fine "as long as I didn't break any rules."

The 25-year-old said he has long been fascinated by life inside the DPRK. Photo / Drew Goldberg
The 25-year-old said he has long been fascinated by life inside the DPRK. Photo / Drew Goldberg

In the video he mentioned travellers must stick to their tour group at all times or "risk severe consequences."

Binsky said he didn't get to see life outside Pyongyang and would go back to North Korea in a heartbeat.

But he said he wasn't sure if he could due to the interest in his video and the fact that bloggers and journalists generally aren't welcome in the DPRK.

"Maybe someone in the DPRK will recognise my face and then I'll never get out," he said.

Although propaganda is used in the north, Binsky said it wasn't as obvious in the south, with most generally unconcerned by their communist neighbours.

"Honestly, most of my former students laughed when I brought up North Korea or Kim Jong Un," he said.

"They think it's a big joke, and they are not scared or intimidated by their neighbours to the north in the slightest."


* Another visitor to North Korea, not Binsky, shared the opening video.