I would like to thank the TAB because since they changed the way to bet on the computer, it is so complicated and confusing that I have not had a bet.

It is saving me hundreds of dollars, so to you, the TAB, I say a big "thank you".
No doubt in time I will learn it again, and I will be back betting. But, until then, I am on a roll.

GARY STEWART
Foxton Beach


Traps for travellers

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If you are travelling overseas and considering a cash card, make sure you know exactly what to do.

We decided to try one on our recent trip to Australia. We have travelled to many countries and usually use our credit card with no problems, but this time let's try something different.

The card "our" bank uses has its logo and is known as our bank's global currency card, but the card and website are controlled by another agency. We found it a very difficult website to navigate.

After much hair-pulling and teeth-gnashing and help from our bank we managed to get a card, load it with Australian currency and activate it. Australia, here we come.

Be aware that in Australia, if you use another bank's ATM machine to withdraw cash, you are charged $3. In a strange city, in need of cash, you use the first ATM machine you come to and have to pay the fee.

After a great holiday we come home to check our global currency card balance. Shock, horror — what are all these entries debiting us for currency conversion fee? We had a card loaded with Australian currency, why the fee?

We rang our bank on the 0800 number and eventually got through to our bank's answerphone. Left name and phone number, explaining we wanted an appointment to talk to someone about all these fees. To date, no reply from our bank — very bad customer service.

We go to the bank, explain our problem to a lady teller and ask to see someone.
We stood at her counter for nearly an hour after ringing the card's 0800 number. When she eventually got through, the call centre person had a foreign accent and was very difficult to understand.

She wanted to sort my husband's account first, so asked him all sorts of security questions, but he was struggling to understand her.

I could not understand her either, so I passed phone to the lady teller. She listened patiently to the explanations.

Apparently the ATM machine screen had two questions and we, apparently, clicked we wanted to use home currency.

Now, we are not that dumb and we have no knowledge of having seen or answered these questions. Why would we click we wanted to use home currency, rather than local currency when we had a card loaded with Australian currency?

Anyway, no arguing with the call centre — they say that was what we did, and we are having to pay extra money in currency conversion fees.

To top off our holiday, our evening Auckland to Whanganui flight was cancelled — from what we can gather, no fault of Air Chathams.

So we have to find a bed and meal for the night at a cost of $246. The excess on our travel insurance $250, so no luck there either.

But 2019 is a new year, so we will try to keep on smiling.

S WAIGHT
Whanganui


Rabbits amok

I'm delighted to see your headline (January 13) warning us that "Rabbits run amok in Taihape cemetery among the graves".

Amok is a Malay word meaning a furious assault, and "running amok" is indulging in physical violence while in a state of frenzied thirst for blood.

I presume the rabbits are using the Malay kris, a dagger with a wavy blade.

Are the rabbits now carnivorous? Perhaps somebody should warn the Greens and the SPCA that this might be what happens when you let nature take its course without sensible intervention?

RICHARD PEIRCE
Marton