The royal couple has delighted crowds at Rotorua's Government Gardens as they did a walkabout with the public on Wednesday afternoon.

Grey clouds loomed as cheers echoed from the crowd when the Duke and Duchess stepped out of the car.

A group of children gave an impromptu haka to Prince Harry.

The crowds squealed with excitement as the royal couple walked past them.

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One little girl was allowed past the barriers and gave Meghan a hug.

Two year old Catalina Rivera said she was "very happy" to get a hug from Meghan.

The tot arrived with her mum Mercedes Dr Rivera and their Rotorua friend Bianca Alvarez at 12pm to nab a front row spot.

Alvarez said she had always loved Princess Diana and her children.

Grace Collins, 18, said it was so worth the three hour wait. "Oh my god, she is gorgeous," referring to Meghan.

The Duke of Sussex , Prince Harry, greets the crowds at Government Gardens during their visit to Rotorua today. Photo/Ben Fraser
The Duke of Sussex , Prince Harry, greets the crowds at Government Gardens during their visit to Rotorua today. Photo/Ben Fraser

Four young boys got the best spot up a tree. One of them, DJ Katia, said he had been waiting up the tree, right next to the walk through, for just over an hour. His mum, Trudy, said it was a good idea her son had, and he got a better view than her.

'Briwis' Cam and Sophie McKinnon from Tauranga were hoping for a second look at the couple after they and their family (wife Bev and daughter Pippa) got "four good handshakes" from Meghan at the other end of the walk.

"She looked very royal considering she hasn't been doing this that long," said Cam McKinnon.

Sophia, Lily, Charlotte and Sophie from Ngakuru have traditions NZ buzzy bees to give the couple.
Sophia, Lily, Charlotte and Sophie from Ngakuru have traditions NZ buzzy bees to give the couple.

Sophia, Lily, Charlotte and Sophie from Ngakuru had traditional New Zealand buzzy bees to give the couple.

There were four bags full to the brim of gifts people had given to the royal couple.

It included letters, flowers, books and soft toys.

Royal watcher Barry Jenkins said it was incredible. "It is a great day."

The pair began the walk at the museum end of Queens Drive and finished at the Princes Gate.

"I live in Rotorua so I couldn't not come down here," said British-born Sarah Pearson, who was born in the same hospital as Prince Harry.

"I feel like my relatives have come to town.

"And he's ginger," she said, gesturing to her own red hair, her face expertly painted with a full Union Jack.

People lined the fence had brought banners and flags hoping to get the attention of the royal couple.

The crowd cheered as a cluster of police officers walked the route the royals took through the Government Gardens.

People were asked to refrain from climbing the archway as everyone jostled for a view.

Kids from Rerewhaakaitu waiting for the royals at the Government Gardens. Photo / Ben Fraser
Kids from Rerewhaakaitu waiting for the royals at the Government Gardens. Photo / Ben Fraser

There were also lots of people wearing homemade crowns.

"Fancy a cuppa Megs, I have banana bread," a sign read.

"That bump suits you! She has one too (arrow)," said another.

Rotorua mayor Steve Chadwick said she couldn't be happier with the way everything had gone. "We have done it the Rotorua way".

The crowd practised saying "kia ora" while they waited.

Maddy Kedian, 3, from Papamoa said she couldn't wait to see Princess Meghan. She had been waiting two hours.

"We're royal fans and Suits fans," said John Paul College students Ashleigh Hart, 17 and Carmela Espellarga, 18. The pair and friends were waiting at the fence line since 12.30pm. "We just love them both so much. Huge fans."

Debbie Whare and Reta Mutua had been waiting since 10am and had a fluffy kiwi toy to give Meghan and Harry. "We hope they take it for their baby."

Shareena Dixon and Savannah Soloman use teamwork to get a good shot of the royals. Photo / NZME
Shareena Dixon and Savannah Soloman use teamwork to get a good shot of the royals. Photo / NZME

Shareena Dixon and Savannah Soloman had been waiting since 9am to see the royals.

Dixon said they shook Harry's hand on one side of the walk through then decided to run round to the other to try and see Meghan.

"Then she went over on the other side and I was like 'get on my back!'" Solomon was pretty sure she got a good shot.

Carey Bryant went along at 2.30pm with her friends and although didn't get a great spot, being three rows back, still managed to have her hand shaken by Prince Harry.

"I will never wash my hands again."

Axel King, 6, with his Heads Together headband, waiting to see Prince Harry. Photo / NZME
Axel King, 6, with his Heads Together headband, waiting to see Prince Harry. Photo / NZME

Alison and Axel, 6, King got to talk to Harry after the prince spotted Axel's Heads Together charity headband.

Alison, who is English but now lives in Rotorua, said the charity was formed by Harry with William and Kate.

"It was the London Marathon official charity last year when I ran it and we all got the headband in our race packs. Harry said 'where did you get that?'.

"He asked me where we were from, if I ran the marathon and if I stole it from the charity," she laughed.

"Axel claimed it as soon as he saw it so I knew that's what he should wear today to get [Harry's] attention."