More than 100 boats of all shapes, sizes and vintages took part in Saturday's Tall Ships and Classic Invitational Race, hosted every January for the past 45 years by the Russell Boating Club.

Held in idyllic conditions of sunshine and a 15-knot breeze, the race was followed by prizegiving, one of New Zealand's biggest hāngī and dancing until the wee hours at the club's Matauwhi Bay headquarters.

The square rigger R Tucker Thompson brought its own sea shanty band to motivate the crew. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The square rigger R Tucker Thompson brought its own sea shanty band to motivate the crew. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Whangarei-based Arcadian was one of several junk-rigged vessels taking part in Saturday's race. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Whangarei-based Arcadian was one of several junk-rigged vessels taking part in Saturday's race. Photo / Peter de Graaf
San Francisco-registered Regulus, a William Hand gaff-rigged schooner, flew the flag for the United States. Photo / Peter de Graaf
San Francisco-registered Regulus, a William Hand gaff-rigged schooner, flew the flag for the United States. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The big and the small of it: Silvertip, a 34m superyacht, dwarfs Ruru, a tiny, lug-rigged sailing dinghy known as a Northumbrian Coble. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The big and the small of it: Silvertip, a 34m superyacht, dwarfs Ruru, a tiny, lug-rigged sailing dinghy known as a Northumbrian Coble. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Vessels of every shape and size jostle for space at the starting line off Russell. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Vessels of every shape and size jostle for space at the starting line off Russell. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Corona, an 8m gaff-rigged mullet boat, dates back to 1936. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Corona, an 8m gaff-rigged mullet boat, dates back to 1936. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The sloop Phantom heads for Onslow Rock, the furthest point of Saturday's course. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The sloop Phantom heads for Onslow Rock, the furthest point of Saturday's course. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The German-owned 18.5m wooden yawl Pantagruel was built in 1920. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The German-owned 18.5m wooden yawl Pantagruel was built in 1920. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The UK-registered schooner Happy Spirit II demonstrates its unusual
The UK-registered schooner Happy Spirit II demonstrates its unusual "gollywobbler" sailing rig as it heads towards the finish line. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Californian Kiwi fills its spinnaker as it heads back towards Russell. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Californian Kiwi fills its spinnaker as it heads back towards Russell. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The coveted Tall Ships trophy includes a scrimshaw sperm whale's tooth carved by the late Russell sailing legend Bill Sellers. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The coveted Tall Ships trophy includes a scrimshaw sperm whale's tooth carved by the late Russell sailing legend Bill Sellers. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Tom Schnackenberg, of America's Cup fame, accepts the
Tom Schnackenberg, of America's Cup fame, accepts the "Cock of the Bay" trophy on behalf of the superyacht Silvertip. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Xanadu II Owner Tony Dunlop, of Russell's Te Wahapu, accepts the Classic Invitational handicap trophy from boating club commodore Barry Newland. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Xanadu II Owner Tony Dunlop, of Russell's Te Wahapu, accepts the Classic Invitational handicap trophy from boating club commodore Barry Newland. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Eleven-year-old Cameron Browne, son of Zindabar owner Tony Browne, accepts the tall ships line honours trophy. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Eleven-year-old Cameron Browne, son of Zindabar owner Tony Browne, accepts the tall ships line honours trophy. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Steam rises as the covers come off one of the biggest hangi in New Zealand. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Steam rises as the covers come off one of the biggest hangi in New Zealand. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The first of more than 800 hangi packs emerge from the pit. Photo / Peter de Graaf
The first of more than 800 hangi packs emerge from the pit. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Lily-Rose Voakes from Paihia gets her kai from hangi volunteer Grace Cooper of Russell. Photo / Peter de Graaf
Lily-Rose Voakes from Paihia gets her kai from hangi volunteer Grace Cooper of Russell. Photo / Peter de Graaf